Saturday, November 14, 2009

Veterans Day for my Great Uncle WWI Honor Roll






Walter Flint Noyes, Class of 1915; Died: 26 September 1918 Photo number 280 Box 5


Harvard Memorial Society. Roll of Honor photographs : an inventory



Harvard University

©President and Fellows of Harvard College, 2008
Descriptive Summary

Repository: Harvard University Archives
Call No.: HUD 3567.219.2
Creator: Harvard Memorial Society.
Title: Roll of Honor photographs, ca. 1912-ca. 1919.
Quantity: 367 photographs and 6 metal plaques (6 boxes : 2 cubic feet)
Abstract: The Roll of Honor consists of the names of 373 Harvard men who lost their lives during World War I or who died from injuries they sustained during military service. This collection includes photographs of most of these men.


History of the Roll of Honor Photographs



The Roll of Honor consists of the names of Harvard men who lost their lives during World War I or who died from injuries they sustained during military service. Their portrait photographs and accompanying labels were assembed by the Harvard Memorial Society. The Society probably worked with the help of Harvard's War Records Office. In its final printing, A Roll of Honor of Harvard Men Who Have Given Their Lives for Liberty and Democracy in the War Against Germany lists 373 names.


Wooden exhibition stands were erected in Widener Library to display the Roll of Honor and photographs. The stands were designed by the Boston architect Charles A. Coolidge (later of Shepley, Bulfinch, Rutan, and Coolidge). The photographs were displayed according to the order in which names were listed on the Honor Roll.


A ceremony to commemorate the men was held on May 30, 1920. At this ceremony, General Pershing laid a wreath under the Roll of Honor and viewed the photographs.



A permanent memorial to the World War I dead joined the memorial to Harvard's other war dead when the south portico of Memorial Church was inscribed with the names, and the stands were moved to Memorial Hall. When Memorial Hall underwent renovations in the mid-1990s, the display stands were disassembled and the photographs and labels were transferred to the University Archives.