Saturday, August 30, 2008




Mary & John Pilgrim Ship

Albert E. Bishop - Son of Harriette Patten Noyes
To view the older posts

Click on

Older Posts (lineal geneaological record) Below or

View blog Archives on the right sidebar.

Note:

Some are very long.

God Bless you Paul Noyes for providing me with such useful information.

Shameless plug-

Please vist the Many Google Ads on the right panel (just click on) Gauranteed no add-ons. Mostly are well known Genealogy related sites (useful). There is enourmoust amounts of information here all for free. I get a few pennies per click, think of it like a hat- lol

============================================

MUSIC

At the bottom of the page is a wonderful music player.
It is set for Love songs.
Click on one of thousands , set the volume or let it run. Enjoy!
Kick back and read about your 1000 years of history

============================================

Get your official Coat of Arms as you see in the right side bar FREE in .JPG format

I know this to be accurate because I have my Mothers Great Uncle's Book the " Descendants of Nicholas, James & Peter Noyes."

Printed in 1905 researched back through the ages and is illustrated and described in detail...

Email Me at aebishop@msn.com for a 8x10 High Resolution Photo Quality .JPG

If you want me to print one in Gloss or Matte finish I will only charge a nominal Charge of $10.00. which includes Mailer.

=============================================

The Mass Flow of Pilgrims.
Although Roanoke, Jamestown, and the Plymouth Colonies preceded the Puritans, the Puritan immigration was the first "en masse" immigration to the America's. It was spearheaded by Winthrop's Fleet in 1630 of 1,000 souls. The population of the other settlements in America probably didn't exceed 2,500 souls before they landed. Two hundred people died the first winter, two hundred gave up and went back to England the next spring. In the next 10 years, 20,000 Englishmen immigrated to Massachusetts, primarily fueled by the Puritan exodus.

========================================

The Big Connection to the First Prince's of Wales


Sarah Merick and Edward Noyes family
The Meyricks are of the purest and noblest of Cambrian blood and possessed the same ancestral estates and residence at Bodorgan, Angelsey, Wales, without interruption for about 1000 years, and still occupied in 1901 by the Meyricks. They have the rare distinction of being lineally descended from the Sovereign Prince of Wales the First of the Welsh Royal Family, and from Edward the First, (see Burke's Peerage). Meyric pg. 945, descended from the marriage of Einiawn Sais Ap David,of Bodorgan, Usher of the Palace at Recus, with Eva, daughter and heiress of Meredydd Ap Cadwgan of Bodorgan, see Coat of Arms in Burke's Genealogical Armory 1884. The following descent from Meyric is as follows:-


Cydavail, Judge of Powys Court, Wales, about 1200.
Samuel, son of the above.
Modoc, son of the above
Tydyr, son of the above
Thorworth, son of the above.
Davydd, son of the above
Einiawn, son of the above
Heylyn, son of the above
Llewellyn, son of the above.
Menric, 3rd son of Llewellyn above, who married Margaret, daughter of Roland, Rector of Aberfraw, Angelesey,
Wales, and had Issue:-
1.Richard Merriok Esq, of Bodorgen.
2.Rt Rev Roland Merrick, D.D. Bishop of Bangor.
3.William Merrick.
4.Owain Merrick.
5.Rev John Merrick, born 1513, see subject 5872 above.
6.Rev Edmund Merrick, Li.D. Arch-deacon of Bangor.
7.Rev Reynalt Merrick, Rector of Lanllechid, Wales.
8.Alice Merrick. Was married and had a family.
9.Sionedd Merrick. ditto
10.Agnes Merrick. ditto



From Noyes Genealogies 1897 pg. 10



Meyrick ap LLwellyn was Captain of the Guard at King Henry the VIII Coronation April 26, 1509. He was first High Sheriff of the Court of Anglesey. Which he held until his death from him the name “Meyrick” signifying “a guardian” is derived as a surname, in pursuance to the act of Henry VIII, requiring that all surnames at the time be known by his descendant as a surname. There being no surnames up to that time in Wales.




Meyrick ap LLewellyn was succeeded by his oldest son Richard Meyrick who was of great influence the County. Rowland the second son of Merick ap Llewellyn was the first Protestant Bishop of Bangor. And was buried in Bangor Cathedral. From him are descended the Mericks of Goodrich Court of Bush. To “James Minrick" in Wales 1612. landed in Charleston Mass. 1630 married to Margeret –ab 1652 was cooker and a fish packer by trade Moved to Newbury Mass. Ab. 1657 - Sarah Merrick and Edward Noyes.


==============================


Origin of Surname Noyes

Latin Banner on the Coat-of-Arms.


Nuncia pacis oliva

Translated: A message of peace.


First found in Wiltshire where they were seated from very early times and were granted lands by Duke William of Normandy, their liege Lord, for their distinguished assistance at the Battle of Hastings in 1066 A.D.

Recorded as Noyce, Noyse, Noice, and Noyes, this is an English medieval surname. However spelt it is a patronymic form of the biblical male given name Noah from the word "noach" meaning long-lived. The are two possible origins for the surname. The first is as an Introduction into Europe by the returning Crusaders knights of the 12th century, fresh from their many attempts to rescue the city of Jerusalem from the hands of the Muslims. It became the fashion for these returning warriors to christen their subsequent children with biblical or hebrew names, which later developed into surnames. The second possibity is the name of an actor who played the part of Noah in the medieval miracle plays based on the story of Noah and his ark. The forename is first recorded as Noe in the Staffordshire Chartulary of the year 1125, whilst the surname is well recorded in the surviving London church registers from the Elizabethan times. These recordings include those of Alice Noyes who married an Edmund Holmes at the church of St. Katherine by the Tower (of London) on June 16th 1661, and Richard Noice, who was christened at St Peter-le-Poer, on July 5th 1730. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Simon Noysse. This was dated 1327, in the Subsidy Rolls of the county of Suffolk, during the reign of King Edward 111rd of England, 1327 - 1377. Throughout the centuries, surnames in every country have continued to "develop" often leading to astonishing variants of the original spelling.


=======================================



You are Related to President Benjamin Harrison
A signer of the Declaration of Independence.

See Right Panel

9th President

Benjamin HARRISON was born in 1726. He died in 1791.
A signer of the Declaration of Independence

================================

"In February, 1633-34 the Council for New England, assembled at Whitehall, England, adopted an order placing certain restrictions on the transportation of passengers and merchandise to the colony of Massachusetts Bay; and before the ship "Mary and John" and eight other vessels, then lying in the river Thames, were allowed to sail, instructions were issued expressly providing that the captains in command of these vessels

"shall cause the Prayers contained in the Book of Common Prayers, established in the Church of England, to be said daily at the usual hours of Morning and Evening Prayers, and that hey cause all persons on board said ships to be present at the same."

In the ship "Mary and John" came Thomas Parker, James Noyes, John Spencer, Henry Short, Henry Lunt, John Bartlett, and many others, who ultimately settled in Newbury. Upon their arrival in New England most of these passengers went to Agawam, now Ipswich, Mass., where they remained until the spring of 1635.

Meanwhile Sir Richard Saltonstall, Henry Sewall, Richard and Stephen Dummer, with others from Wiltshire, England had organized a company for the purpose of stock-raising at a time when the prices for cattle, horses, and sheep were at their highest. They added to their own domestic herds some imported Flemish stock, and persuaded John Spencer, Henry Short, Richard Kent, Thomas Parker, and others to join them in the enterprise, and establish a settlement on the river Quascacunquen, now Parker River.

Sept. 3, 1633, the General Court granted"John Winthrop, junior, and his assignes"permission to set up a trading house on the Merrimack River; and under date of May 6, 1635, the House of Deputies passed the following order:-

Quascacunquen is allowed by the court to be a plantation, and it is referred to Mr. (John) Humphrey, Mr. (John) Endicott, Captain (Nathaniel) Turner, and Captain (William) Trask, or any three of them, to set out the bounds of Ipswich and Quascacunquen, or so much thereof as they can; and the name of said plantation shall be changed, and shall hereafter be called Newberry.

Further, it is ordered that it shall be in the power of the court to take order that the said plantation shall receive a sufficient company to make a competent towne.

Previous to this date, undoubtedly, a few venturesome fishermen had built temporary residences on the banks of the Merrimack and Quascacunquen rivers; but they were looked upon as trespassers and intruders, for the General Court had forbidden all persons from settling within their jurisdiction without leave.

Rev. Thomas Parker and those associated with him, having obtained permission to begin a plantation"to be called Newberry", made preparations to remove from Ipswich early in the spring. There were no roads through the trackless forest, and the transportation of women and children and household goods overland was impracticable. Tradition asserts that they came by the way of Plum Island Sound, in open boats, and landed, in the month of May or June, 1635, on the north shore of what is now the river Parker, in a little cover about one hundred rods below the bridge; Nicholas Noyes, the brother of Rev. James Noyes, being the first to leap ashore.

Near this secluded spot a number of summer cottages have recently been erected, giving to the place a pleasant, home-like look; but two centuries and a half ago the prospect was less agreeable and inviting.


"...Eastward, cold, wide marshes stretched away,
Dull, dreary flats without a bush or tree,
O'ercrossed by winding creeks, where twice a day
Gurgled the waters of the moon-struck sea;
And faint with distance came the stifled roar,
The melancholy lapse of waves on the low shore."

Inland hills rising above hills stood like sentinels over the almost unbroken wilderness. Centuries before this memorable landing Indians had hunted in these forests and fished in the placid stream that ebbs and flows to the falls of Newbury; but only a few of that race remained to resist the encroachments of the white-faced strangers. Dismal and gloomy must have been the outlook as these brave pioneers gathered together at the close of the first day, and contemplated the prospect before them. They knew that wild beasts were roaming through the forests, and whether the red men would welcome them as friends or foes was as yet uncertain.

"Their descendants can have but a faint idea of the difficulties they encountered, and of the dangers that continually hung over their heads, threatening every moment to overwhelm them like a torrent, and sweep the, with those who they dearly loved, to the silent tomb."

Undismayed by these difficulties and dangers, the new settlers instinctively turned their attention to the cultivation of the soil and the development of the resources of nature. Here and there along the winding river they appropriated the few clear spots where the natives had formerly planted corn, and promptly took possession of the neighboring marshes where the growing crop of salt grass promised an abundant harvest. There was no lack of work; no room for idle dreamers. Houses had to be built, land ploughed and tilled, and sheds erected for the protection of cattle before winter set in. House lots, planting lots, and meadow lots were laid out and granted to individual members of the community, and the original entries, giving names and dates, can still be seen on the old records of the town; but how many houses were erected or how many families settled in Newbury during the first year of its existence it is impossible to state with exactness.

Governor Winthrop, in his History of New England, under date of June 3, 1635, records the arrival of two ships with Dutch cattle; and the same day the ship "James" arrived from Southampton, bringing, among other passengers, John Pike, father of the famous Robert Pike, of Salisbury, and one Thomas Coleman, who had been employed b the projectors of the stock-raising company to provide food for the cattle and take care of them for a specified term of years.

In the Massachusetts Colony Records, under date of July 8, 1635:-

It is ordered that there shall be a convenient quantity of land set out by Mr. Dumer and Mr. Bartholemewe, within the bounds of Newbury, for the keeping of the sheepe and cattell that came over in the Dutch shipps this yeare, and to belong to the owners of said cattel.

Evidently, those who were engaged in this new enterprise intended to utilize the vacant lands and at the same time establish a safe and profitable business for themselves; but Coleman, becoming dissatisfied, declined to carry out his part of the contract, and the General Court finally ordered a division of the grain that had been imported, and instructed each owner to take care of his own cattle.

From:"Ould Newbury": Historical and Biographical Sketches by John J. Currier (1896), Damrell and Upham, Boston.

Friday, August 29, 2008

Certificate of March 26, 1634, London


The Mary & John left Southampton or London, England abt Mar 24/26, 1634 with her Master, Robert Sayres, arriving in New England.

Alphabetical order:

Anthoney John (Possibly from Hampstead to Portsmouth, RI. 36 pg 110)
Avery Thomas
Ballard William (Possibly of Bradwell, Suffolk, bound for Lynn, MA. Ref: NEGR 61/69 36 pg 150)
Bartlett John
Browne Richard
Browne Mrs. Edith
Browne George, son of Richard Browne
Clarke William
Coker Robert
Cole Thomas
Cole Mrs. Anna
Easton Nicholas (From Lymington, Hampshire, bound for Newport RI. Ref: Austin Gen p 252. 36 pg 60)
Easton Mrs. ----
Fowler Phillip (from Marlborough, Wiltshire, bound for Ipswitch and Salisbury. Ref: Banks Mss. 36 pg 179)
Fowler Mrs. Mary
Fowler Hester
Fowler Joseph
Fowler Mary
Fowler Samuel
Fowler Thomas
Franklin William
Gillett Matthew
Godfrey John
Hewlett Matthew
Hibbens/Fribbens William
Hibbens Mrs. Anne
Jacob Richard
Jurden/Jordan Stephen
Kent Richard (From Wallop, Hampshire, bound for Newbury. Ref: Banks Mss 36 pg 63)
Kent Mrs. Jane
Kent Mary
Kent Richard
Kingsman Robert
Ladd Daniel (From Dartmouth, Devonshire, bound for Ipswith/Salisbury, Ref: NEGR 39/345. 36 pg 21)
Littlehall Richard
Luff John
Lunt Henry
Marshe John
Moody/Moudey William
Moody Mrs. Sarah
Moody Joshua
Mussey Abraham
Mussey John
Myles/Miles Joseph
Neuman Robert
Newbey William
Newman Thomas
Newman Mrs. ----
Newman John, son of Thomas
Newman John
Noyce James Rev
Noyes Mrs. Sarah
Noyce Nicholas, son of Rev James Noyce
Noyes Nicholas
Osgood Christopher (from Marlborough, Wiltshire, bound for Ipswitch. Ref: NEGR 20/27. 36 pg 178)
Osgood Mrs. Margery
Parker Thomas Rev. (alos listed on the Susan & Ellin)
Pope Joseph
Reynolds Richard
Savery Thomas
Savery William
Sever/Seaver Robert
Shorte Henry
Spencer John
Spencer William
Sweete Thomas
Trace/Tracey William
Traske Henry
Travers Henry
Vincent Adrian
West Thomas
Wheeler/Whelyer/ John (Wheeler, from Salisbury, Wiltshire, bound for Newbury, Salisbury and Hampton. Ref: Essex Inst Vol 44. 36 pg 180)
Wheeler Mrs. Anne
Wheeler Anne
Wheeler David
Wheeler Elizabeth
Wheeler Mercy
Wheeler Roger
White William
Woodbridge John Rev

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Roll order:

Certificate of March 24, 1633/4, London

Anthoney John (Possibly from Hampstead to Portsmouth, RI. 36 pg 110)
Avery Thomas
Bartlett John
Browne Richard
Browne Mrs. Edith
Browne George, son of Richard Browne
Clarke William
Coker Robert
Fowler Phillip (from Marlborough, Wiltshire, bound for Ipswitch and Salisbury. Ref: Banks Mss. 36 pg 179)
Fowler Mrs. Mary
Mary Fowler (+)
Samuel Fowler (+)
Hester Fowler (+)
Joseph Fowler (+)
Thomas Fowler (+)
Godfrey John
Hewlett Matthew
Jacob Richard
Jurden/Jordan Stephen
Kingsman Robert
Ladd Daniel (From Dartmouth, Devonshire, bound for Ipswith/Salisbury, Ref: NEGR 39/345. 36 pg 21)
Littlehall Richard
Luff John
Marshe John
Moudey William
Mrs. Sarah Moody
Joshua Moody
Neuman Robert
Noyce Nicholas, son of Rev James Noyce
Osgood Christopher (from Marlborough, Wiltshire, bound for Ipswitch. Ref: NEGR 20/27. 36 pg 178)
Mrs. Margery Osgood
Reynolds Richard
Savery Thomas
Savery William
Sever/Seaver Robert
Sweete Thomas
Trace/Tracey William
Traske Henry
Travers Henry
Vincent Adrian
West Thomas
Whelyer John (Wheeler, from Salisbury, Wiltshire, bound for Newbury, Salisbury and Hampton. Ref: Essex Inst Vol 44. 36 pg 180)
Mrs. Anne Wheeler
David Wheeler
Anne Wheeler
Roger Wheeler
Elizabeth Wheeler
Mercy Wheeler
White William
Woodbridge John Rev


Certificate of March 26, 1634, London

Ballard William (Possibly of Bradwell, Suffolk, bound for Lynn, MA. Ref: NEGR 61/69 36 pg 150)
Cole Thomas
Mrs. Anna Cole
Easton Nicholas (From Lymington, Hampshire, bound for Newport RI. Ref: Austin Gen p 252. 36 pg 60)
Mrs. ---- Easton
Franklin William
Gillett Matthew
Hibbens/Fribbens William
Mrs. Anne Hibbens
Kent Richard
Mrs. Jane Kent
Mary Kent
Richard Kent
Kent Richard (From Wallop, Hampshire, bound for Newbury. Ref: Banks Mss 36 pg 63)
Lunt Henry
Mussey Abraham
Mussey John
Myles/Miles Joseph
Newbey William
Newman John
Newman John, son of Thomas
Newman Thomas
Mrs. ---- Newman
Noyce James Rev
Mrs. Sarah Noyes
Nicholas Noyes
Parker Thomas Rev. (alos listed on the Susan & Ellin)
Pope Joseph
Shorte Henry
Spencer John
Spencer William

Mary & John sources:
http://english-america.com/spls/634ne002.html#Mary_&_John
http://olivetreegenealogy.com/ships/mary_john1633.shtml (contains additional names)

Pilgrim Ship Lists
Pilgrim Ship Passengers
Genealogy Main Page

1 Through 4th Generation Noyes





















Lora Marie Bishop, Daughter of Albert E. Bishop jr. and Lynn Marie Bishop


Pictures at top: Carl Patten Noyes and Brother Walter Noyes circa 1896


Carl Patten Noyes February 21, 1921 Elected Supernumerary, Hartford Police Department.




Carl Patten Noyes, Ab. 1946 Regular Police




Harriette Patten Noyes and Army Air corp. Corporal Albert Edward Bishop circa 1942







First Generation



1. Al BISHOP II was born on November 29, 1958. Married Lynn Marie Herr, 1995

i. Lora Marie was born on November 2, 1996 in Saint Paul, Minnesota


Second Generation

2. ALBERT E BISHOP was born on September 22, 1916. BISHOP and Harriette Patton NOYES were married.

3. Harriette Patten NOYES was born about June 28 1919 in , , Connecticut.2 She appeared in the census on 15 Jan 1920 in Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut.2 (age 6 months.) She appeared in the census on 21 Apr 1930 in Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut.3 (age 10.) BISHOP and Harriette Patton NOYES, Graduated from Buckley High School, Hartford Ct. 1937. Went to work for the Travelers Insurance Co. in 1937. Worked there for 8 years in the payroll department. Was a Nurses Aid for the Hartford Hospital. Met Albert Bishop at the Travelers recreation room through a sponsored dance for servicemen. Met up the street after the dance. Harriette asked 'would you like to meet my parents"? They took a trolley car to the Carl Noyes Home. Albert was sent to Africa. They wrote back and forth during his tour in Africa. They were married in 1944. had the following children:

i. Margret Gladys Bishop was born March 4, 1945 - 1 Son Nicholas (Nick)
ii. Carol Ann Bishop- was born April 10, 1947 - 2 Children Tracy and Troy
iii. Alberta Mae Bishop- was born August 4 1949
iv. Mary Louise Bishop- was born December 17, 1953-1 Daughter Stephanie
v. Albert Edward Bishop-1 Daughter Lora

Albert E Bishop. Enlisted in the Army Air Corp as very young man having served 2 tours of duty in WWII. He was sent to North Africa and was a non commissioned officer and Chief Aircraft Mechanic on the B-17 and other fighter aircraft of the theater. He was with a secret squadron formed to help the British General Montgomery. The 62nd Squadron, 57th fighter group. Known as the "The Fabulous Fighting 57th" .

This was a success against great hardship and odds and was the turning point and the ultimate defeat of General Rommel.

Albert Bishop Sr. was wounded during a surprise Nazi raid which lead to his return state side.

Al spent the next 39 years working for the Whirlpool Corporation in Saint Paul.
Al's was nick named "Bulldog" but was well loved and admired by friends.

He was the 4 th District Commander in the VFW and Aid-de Camp to the Commander in chief of the Veterans Affairs in Washington, DC. He had close personal ties to Hubert H. Humphrey in the early 197o's.

Al as he was called in White Bear Township, the largest populated township in Minnesota was the Justice of the Peace from 1952 to the elimination of JP process. in the mid 1970's.

Al and Harriette were married for 56 years having several Grand Children.


Third Generation

6. Carl Patten. NOYES was born on 7 Sep 1895 in , , New Hampshire.4 He appeared in the census on 2 Jun 1900 in Manchester, Hillsborough, New Hampshire.5 (age 4.) He appeared in the census on 20 Apr 1910 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts.6 (age 14.) He appeared in the census on 15 Jan 1920 in Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut.2 (enumerated as Noyce; age 25; typewriter; renting home on Broad St.) He appeared in the census on 21 Apr 1930 in Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut.3 (age 35; city policeman; married at age 22; renting a home on Hillside Ave. for $43.) Carl P. NOYES and Gladys E. [NOYES] were married before 1918.2

7. Gladys E. [NOYES] was born about 1892 in , , Massachusetts.2 She appeared in the census on 15 Jan 1920 in Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut.2 (age 28.) She appeared in the census on 21 Apr 1930 in Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut.3 (age 39; married at age 26.) Carl P. NOYES and Gladys E. [NOYES] had the following children:




i. Grace Elizabeth NOYES was born about Feb 1918 in , , Connecticut. She appeared in the census on 15 Jan 1920 in Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut.2 (age 1 year 11 months.) She appeared in the census on 21 Apr 1930 in Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut.3 (age 12.)

ii. Harriette Patton NOYES. was born June 28th 1919

iii. Charlotte Ann NOYES was born on about 1923 in , , Connecticut.3

iv. Annie C. NOYES was born about Oct 1925 in , , Connecticut.3 She appeared in the census on 21 Apr 1930 in Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut.3 (age 4 years and 6 months.)

v. Betty Noyes. was born on

Fourth Generation

12. Isaac William NOYES was born on 24 Feb 1861 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.7,8 He appeared in the census on 2 Jun 1900 in Manchester, Hillsborough, New Hampshire.5 (age 39; shoe cutter; widower; renting a home on E. Spruce St.) He appeared in the census on 20 Apr 1910 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts.6 (age 44; shoe cutter; owned home with a mortgage on Lonsdale St.) Children born in Raymond and Manchester, N.H. Isaac William NOYES and Joan D'Arc PATTEN were married in 1890.7

13. Joan D'Arc PATTEN lived in Canada before 1890.8 Isaac William NOYES and Joan D'Arc PATTEN had the following children:

i. Walter F. NOYES was born on 24 Jan 1892.4 He appeared in the census on 2 Jun 1900 in Manchester, Hillsborough, New Hampshire.5 (age 8.) He appeared in the census on 20 Apr 1910 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts.6 (age 18.)
6 ii. Carl P. NOYES.

Carl Noyes was a 25 year veteran of the Hartford Police Department

Walter F Noyes Was recommend by a U.S. Senator and Attended West Point He graduated 1st in class. Considered to be genius in military affairs. During a equestrian demonstration, he fell off his horse and died of his injuries.

5th through 7th Generation Noyes




Dr. Rufus Noyes








Fifth Generation

24. Joshua Flint NOYES was born on 23 Jan 1818 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.9,10 He appeared in the census on 18 Jun 1900 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.11 (Age 82; farmer; owned farm free of mortgage.) Joshua Flint NOYES and Lois Ann NOYES were married in 1843.12

25. Lois Ann NOYES was born on 27 Aug 1821 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.12 She died in 1899.12 Joshua Flint NOYES and Lois Ann NOYES had the following children:

i. Elbridge Henry NOYES was born on 22 Jan 1846 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.7,8,13 He died on 15 Jan 1895.7
ii. Harriette Eliza NOYES4 was born on 15 Dec 1848 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.7,8 She appeared in the census on 18 Jun 1900 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.11 (Age 57; living with father.) Associate authoress of NOYES FAMILY BY H.E. NOYES, VOL. 1.

Also authoress of the MEMORIAL HISTORY OF HAMPSTEAD, N.H. and of the HISTORY OF THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF HAMPSTEAD, N.H.
iii.

Dr. Rufus King NOYES4,14 was born on 24 May 1853 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.7,8 Address 50 Chambers St., Boston.

On this date in 1853 (May 24), Rufus King Noyes, M.D., was born in Hampstead, New Hampshire, the son of a prosperous farmer. Noyes graduated from Atkinson Academy in 1872, and received his medical degree from Dartmouth in 1875. He worked at Boston City Hospital as a house surgeon, ranking first in his competitive exam, and receiving a "hospital diploma" after 18 months. He practiced medicine and surgery in Boston throughout his career. "Dr. Noyes is a strong believer in nature, and is the author of the treatise entitled 'The Self-Curability of Diseases,' " according to Samuel Putnam's Four Hundred Years of Freethought (1894). Dr. Noyes compiled the History of Medicine for the Last Four Thousand Years and The Science and Art of Ignorance; or, The Conspiracy of Christian Ministers, Press and Theologians Against Humanity. Dr. Noyes described himself as a Materialist.







iv. Albert Peabody NOYES was born on 6 Sep 1857 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.7,8 He appeared in the census on 18 Jun 1900 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.11 (Age 42; farm laborer; married 1 year; living with father.)
12 v. Isaac William NOYES.



Sixth Generation

48. Edward NOYES15 was born on 19 Feb 1776 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.16-18 He died on 29 Nov 1846.19 There is a depth of pathos on the tone of the following letters, written by Joseph Merrick, and his wife, Sarah (Harriman) Merrick, from Adrian, Mich., to their brother-in-law, Edward Noyes, and his wife, with whom their mother had been left when they moved to Michigan. We of the twentieth century cannot imagine the distance which lay between the new home in Michigan and the old home in New Hampshire sixty years ago. China is nearer to us to-day than New Hampshire was to Michigan when those old letters were written. They are dated Feb., 20, 1841, and addressed to Edward and Sarah Noyes, Hampstead, Rockingham County, N. H. The postage was twenty-five cents, and the letter was sent collect. Joseph's letter is first;

Dear Brother and Sister. After a long abscence from you and a long time sence we have heard from you or any of our friends in your country we have wrote a number of letters to go to your country and have not received any return we cannot think what is the cauze without you are all gon or forgotten us I feel anctious to hear from our friends. I have undertaken Once more to see if we cannot get one from you we have of Late received a letter from a Daughter we have in New York stating that it was not long since one of Brother Grimes sons that came from your country She got some information from him he sayeth that my Mother was liveing when he left and was Liveing with you that was glorious noose to me I have had a grate many serious thoughts concerning my Mothers situation since I left there I never have heard how that Property of Mothers was disposed of whether she has got anything of her own or not let that Be as it may. I Expect your good feelings and Sallys do every thing for her cumfort that you can if there is not anything left of her property for her support let me know and I will assist in her support do let her have everything that is nesary for her cumfort. My Dear Mother I do long to see you once more this side of the grave I do not know as I shell ever injoy that Blesssing I have talked a number of years of cumming there their seems to be something in the way. I talk of trying this summer it is uncertain. but I shall try my best we are now in Michigan in the Village of Adrian and five children in the same place and doing well one at niles in the same State one in pensyvana two in New York and all a doing well we lost a daughter about two years ago a grate loss to us she was about 20 years of age How I wish you to imform me how that property of the old place was Disposed of and the one that owns it now now I wish you would let me know where all my Brothers and Sisters are and how they git along in this world in every respect as nigh as you can I am very anctious to hear. and tell them they must write to me with out fail tell them I havenot forgoten them if they have me do not fail writing as soon as you recive this

I wish you all the Blessings that this world affords and all the famley of ours thrue life and Everlasting hapiness in the world to come

Adrian February 20 1841

From your Brother and friend JOSEPH MERRICK.

when you write say Adrian Lenawee County Michigan

we live in a fine plesant Cuntry and a good sile our helth are good at prisent

At the same date the mother writes:

BELOVED BROTHER AND SISTER:

It is with the greatest pleasure I take my pen in hand to write you a few lines, wishing once more to hear from you, although we are seperated at so great a distance from each other, a distance of one thousand miles, and though the waters of Lake Erie rool between us, my mind is often with you, I often think of the many pleasant visits we have had together in yearse that are past, but now we are deprived of the privilege, but we have the privilege of communicating our thoughts to each other by writing, which I esteem a great blessing. I never expect to see you again in this world, nor any of our friends in that place, but I hope to meet you on fair Canaans happy shore where we shall meet to part no more. I have had great afflictions to pass through since we came to this western country, we have lost two children Eliza and Mary, which was a great loss to us, but God was my support in that trying hour, I trust He will ever be my guide and protector, through this vale of tears. I wrote a letter to Brother Caleb two years ago this winter, but we have not had no answer, I did think that if Bro. Caleb or his wife were living one or both of them would have written to us, but alas we are out of sight and out of mind, it seems as though we were entirely forgotten by our friends in that place. Now Brother Noyes I wish you would write us, and Brother Caleb and any of our friends who feel disposed to, a letter from you would be joyfully received, we want to hear all the ( ), and how all the Brothers and Sisters get along in the world. I want to see you all very much especially Mother Merrick, I hope she has kind attension and everything for her comfort, it will be but a short time before we shall want the same kind care paid to us, yes very soon, I feel as though the day was not far distant. We have everything to make us comfortable and happy, except fruit, and that is getting quite plenty. Do write to us on the reception of this, without fail. We have three children that are not married the two youngest Judith and Byron and Joseph Boards with us. My love and best respects to you all.

From your ever affectionate sister,
SARAH MERRICK.
Edward and Sarah Noyes. Edward NOYES and Sarah MERRICK were married on 19 May 1803 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.19-21 The Noyes Descendants, Vol. I says 1803.

49. Sarah MERRICK was born on 3 Jul 1784 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.20,21 Edward NOYES and Sarah MERRICK had the following children:

i. Mary Darling NOYES was born on 12 Dec 1803 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.9,21 She died in 1874.9
ii. Joseph NOYES21 was born on 3 Dec 1805 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.9,21 He died on 25 Apr 1882.9 Unmarried.
iii. James NOYES was born on 26 Mar 1808 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.9,21 He died in 1864.9,21 (Merrick says 1863.)
iv. Sarah Ann NOYES was born on 19 Mar 1810 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.9,21 Merrick says Aug 19, 1810. She died in 1866.9
v. Edward Rand NOYES was born on 5 Nov 1813 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.21,22 He appeared in the census on 18 Jun 1870 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.23 (Age 56; farmer; value of real estate $1,500.) He appeared in the census on 11 Jun 1880 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.24 (Age 66; farmer.) He died on 8 Mar 1886.22 Member of the State Legislature in 1875.
24 vi. Joshua Flint NOYES.
vii. Eunice NOYES was born on 28 Feb 1819 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.9,21 Merrick says February 29, 1818.
viii. Eliza NOYES was born on 26 Sep 1823 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.9,21 She died on 8 Oct 1894.9
ix. George Washington NOYES was born on 16 Nov 1825 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.9,21 Merrick says Nov. 11, 1825. He died in 1892.9

50. Henry NOYES25 was born on 25 Oct 1789 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.25,26 He died on 26 Sep 1875.25 Soldier in the war of 1812, stationed at Portsmouth, N.H. and received a pension for services rendered. Henry NOYES and Elizabeth PEABODY were married in 1819.25

51. Elizabeth PEABODY was born on 21 Sep 1801 in Portsmouth, Rockingham, New Hampshire.27 She died on 1 Aug 1837.28 Henry NOYES and Elizabeth PEABODY had the following children:

25 i. Lois Ann NOYES.
ii. Elvira Peabody NOYES was born on 13 Aug 1826 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.12 She appeared in the census on 18 Jun 1870 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.23 (Age 44; keeping house.) She appeared in the census on 11 Jun 1880 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.24 (Age 53; keeping house.)
iii. Sarah E. NOYES was born on 12 Sep 1828 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.12
iv. Lavinia J. NOYES was born on 21 Jul 1837 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.12 She appeared in the census on 18 Jun 1870 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire. (Age 33; keeping house living with sister, Elvira and her husband Edward R. Noyes.) She appeared in the census on 11 Jun 1880 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.24 (Age 42; living with sister, Elvira and her husband Edward R. Noyes.)



Seventh Generation

96. Joseph NOYES17,29,30 was born on 1 Nov 1732 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.17,31,32 (The Noyes Descendants, Vol. I says 11 Jan 1731/32.) He lived in Plaistow, Rockingham, New Hampshire in 1741.31 He lived in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire in 1762.31 He died on 11 Jul 1807 in Henniker, Merrimack, New Hampshire.17,31 (While away from home on a business trip he was found dead in the woods at Henniker.) He moved to Plaistow, N.H. in 1741 and in 1762 he bought the farm in Hampstead, N.H. which was still owned by his descendants in 1904, but the Noyes home (the "old red house") was destroyed by fire in 1897. Joseph Noyes served Revolutionary War in the expedition against Crown Point. He also served as a private in Capt. Jesse Page's company of volunteers from Atkinson, in Col. Jacob Gale's regiment, which joined the Continental army in Rhode Island in August, 1778. Was in the battle at Bunker Hill.

Noyes, Joseph. Private, Capt. David Kingman's co., Col. Edward Mitchel's regt.; service, 16 days, on the alarm at Rhode Island of Dec. 8, 1776. Roll endorsed “Alarm Roll to Providence Dec'r 1776.” [Mass. Soldiers & Sailors In The War of The Revolution 11:553]

Noyes, Joseph. Private, Capt. Jonathan Poor's co.; copy of a company return [year not given]; copy of a receipt dated Newbury, March 18, 1777, signed by others of said company for wages for 6 weeks service, appears on reverse of return. [Mass. Soldiers & Sailors In The War of The Revolution 11:553]

Noyes, Joseph.Corporal, Capt. David Kingman's co., Maj. Eliphalet Cary's regt.; marched Aug. 2, 1780; discharged Aug. 9, 1780; service, 7 days; company marched to Rhode Island on the alarm of July 30, 1780. [Mass. Soldiers & Sailors In The War of The Revolution 11:553] Joseph NOYES and Mary FLINT were married on 26 Mar 1762 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.17,18,31 (The Noyes Descendants, Vol. I says 1762.)

97. Mary FLINT was born. Joseph NOYES and Mary FLINT had the following children:

i. Molly NOYES was born on 16 Oct 1762 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.17,18,31 (The Noyes Descendants, Vol. I says 12 Dec 1762.) She published intentions to marry on 3 May 1787 in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts.33 To James Eaton.
ii. Joseph NOYES34 was born on 16 Oct 1764 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.17,18,31 (The Noyes Descendants, Vol. I says 18 Oct 1764.) He died on 23 Dec 1818 in Andover, Merrimack, New Hampshire.17 He was buried after 23 Dec 1818 in Andover, Merrimack, New Hampshire.35 (Simonds Cemetery.) Joseph Noyes began business early in life in Haverhill.

On leaving Haverhill he came to Salisbury, settling on a farm in that portion of the town subsequently included in the town of Franklin. This farm was known as the Noyes farm and was afterwards occupied by L.D. Davenport. After the house on the farm was burned, Noyes moved to the village on the west side of the river, now Franklin, and opened a store in the basement of his house. His domestic life was very unhappy; his wife was extravagant and contracted debts without his knowledge, and a separation resulted. He became involved in quarrels with his neighbors and, declaring that his property should no longer contribute to the support of that community, he moved up the river into Andover, on a farm where he resided until his death. This farm was afterwards occupied by Simeon Brown.

Mr. Noyes was a shrewd, industrious, business man who, by economy and thrift accumulated what at that time was accounted a comfortable fortune. He left three children: Joseph, Thomas Jefferson and Lucy.

The people of Andover and vicinity were especially interested in the following clause in his will:

Item 4. I do hereby direct my executor to take $10,000.00 out of my personal property and bank stock, and appropriate it for the support of a public school; said school to be under the direction of six directors, who shall at first be appointed by my executor, and after that they shall fill their own vacancies. The house for said school to be built on the farm on which I now live, which farm I also give and bequeath for the support of the school; said school to be denominated "Noyes School."

In accordance with this clause of the will the executor, Robert Barber, appointed the following directors: Josiah Badcock, William Proctor, Silas Merrill, John Simonds, John Joseph Bryant and Robert Barber.

An act to incorporate the directors of the Noyes School in the town of Andover, was passed by the Legislature, and approved June 21, 1822. A large, old-style, one-story schoolhouse was built in 1822, on the Noyes farm, nearly opposite the dwelling house, and the school opened in 1823 under the management of Benjamin M. Tyler of Andover, as principal.

For five years the school was very successfully maintained, to the great credit of the principal and directors. The Noyes residence was converted into a boarding house and was always filled with an excellent class of students. Considering all the conditions, this was probably the most successful school during its existence, ever maintained in the town.

When Joseph, the eldest son of Mr. Noyes, became of age, in 1826, he instituted a suit to break the will, on the ground that the testator was not sane. There was a long and bitter legal contest ending, in 1828, in the breaking of the will, the destruction of the school and the distribution of the property amoung the heirs.

The friends of a better education in the community were unwilling to lose the services of Mr. Tyler as a teacher, and plans were soon matured for building the two-story brick building in Franklin village now long known as "the academy." This building was finished and occupied in 1830. The institution was chartered in 1831, as "The Instructor's School," and Mr. Tyler was the principal until his resignation in 1846.

The name of this school clearly indicates its main idea, the training of teachers, and, so far as now known, it was the first of its kind in this part of the country. It was well supported by the community and its success had no small influence in the early history of Franklin.
iii. James NOYES was born on 31 Oct 1767 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.17,18,31 He lived in Adrian, Lenawee, Michigan in 1795.31 He lived in , , Ohio in 1808.31 James went to Adrian, Mich., about 1795, and in 1808 was living in Ohio and had four sons.
iv. Lucy NOYES was born on 20 Oct 1772 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.17,18,31
48 v. Edward NOYES.

98. Joseph MERRICK36 was born on 30 Dec 1749 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.37 He died on 29 Dec 1823 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.20,36 Ae. 74 y. He was Farmer in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.20 One of the grantees of Newbury, Vt., in 1763, and also owned lands in Bath and Hampstead, N. H., and in Cumberland and Lincoln counties, Maine. He was a representative to the legislature in 1776, and held many town offices. He was a member and deacon in Dr. Spring's church, Newburyport, for many years. His daughter, Judith, married Joseph Merrick.

He was a farmer in the town of Hampstead; he served in the Revolutionary war, having been a Sergeant in Captain Joseph Illsley's Company, Colonel Cogswell's Regiment, Essex county, Mass., Volunteers, from Sept. 30, 1776 to Nov. 16, 1776--two months and thirteen days; he died Dec. 29, 1823, at Hampstead, N. H.

Note by Editor.--The parentage of Joseph4, ascribed to Timothy3, is very doubtful, and is here given on the authority of the tradition that the children of Jacob4, the son of Timothy3, whose birth is a matter of record, were known in Hampstead to be own cousins to the children of Joseph4. This evidence is very slight; but it is all the evidence of the parentage of Joseph4 that the compiler, who is a direct descendent of Joseph, and therefore personally interested in definitely defining his parentage, has been able to develop after thirteen years' research. With the issue of this volume it is possible, and even probable, that the data which the author has been unable to discover after years' of research, will be developed as if by chance within a very short time. While such evidence will alter hundreds of records, it is the hope of the author that it may be forthcoming, and that quickly. It is likely that some historian of the family will take this volume as a starting point, and correcting its errors and omissions, in some future years, give to the world a new and better version than this can possibly be.
Joseph MERRICK and Judith LITTLE were married in 1770 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.20,37

99. Judith LITTLE was born on 17 Nov 1753 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.20,37,38 VR says Nov. ___, 1753. She died on 28 May 1846.20 Joseph MERRICK and Judith LITTLE had the following children:

i. Judith MERRICK was born on 22 Jan 1771 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.36
ii. Joseph MERRICK was born on 22 Jun 1773 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.36
iii. Temperance MERRICK was born on 8 Sep 1775 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.20,39
iv. Mary MERRICK was born on 16 Mar 1778 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.36
v. Hannah MERRICK was born on 17 May 1780 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.36
vi. Abner Little MERRICK was born on 22 Jun 1782 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.36
49 vii. Sarah MERRICK.
viii. Nathaniel MERRICK was born on 26 Dec 1786 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.36
ix. Abigail MERRICK was born on 28 Oct 1789 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.36
x. Ann MERRICK was born on 28 Aug 1791 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.36
xi. Joshua MERRICK was born on 20 May 1793 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.36
xii. Lydia MERRICK was born on 28 Dec 1796 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.36

100. Peter NOYES was born on 3 May 1758 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.40,41 VR Plaistow, NH says 5/1/1758. He died on 24 Feb 1847.40,41 Peter NOYES and Sarah NOYES had marriage banns published on 30 Dec 1788 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26 They were married on 22 Jan 1789.42 "Noyes Descendency" says 1789.

101. Sarah NOYES was born on 3 Jan 1768 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26,42 She died on 14 Sep 1827.41 Peter NOYES and Sarah NOYES had the following children:

50 i. Henry NOYES.
ii. Silas NOYES was born on 30 Jul 1791 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.12,26 He died in 1875.12
iii. Amos NOYES was born on 4 Apr 1793 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26 He died on 3 Jan 1810 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26
iv. Daniel NOYES was born on 27 Feb 1795 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.40 VR Atkinson NH says 2/24/1795. He died on 22 Apr 1859.40
v. John NOYES was born on 8 May 1797 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26,40 He died on 17 Jul 1877.40
vi. James NOYES was born on 30 Nov 1798 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.40 VR Atkinson, NH says 12/31/1798. He died on 17 Feb 1867.40
vii. Ira NOYES was born on 29 Jan 1801 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26,43 He published intentions to marry on 11 Jun 1836 in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts.44 To Maria A. McIntire of Salem. He died on 5 Feb 1852.40
viii. Sally NOYES was born on 7 Nov 1803 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26,40,45 She died in 1893.40
ix. Joseph NOYES was born on 11 Aug 1806 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26,40 He died on 7 Apr 1865.40
x. Samuel NOYES was born on 9 Jan 1809 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26,40 He died on 6 Apr 1893.40

102. Josiah Gaines PEABODY was born on 18 Sep 1769 in Newburyport, Essex, Massachusetts.27,28 He died in 1832 in , , New York.27,28 Josiah Gaines PEABODY and Edna GREENOUGH were married on 2 Feb 1796 in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts.27,28

103. Edna GREENOUGH was born in 1775 in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.27,28 She died on 18 Feb 1852 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.28 Josiah Gaines PEABODY and Edna GREENOUGH had the following children:

51 i. Elizabeth PEABODY.

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

8th and 9th Generation Noyes

Eighth Generation

192. Joseph NOYES was born on 20 Sep 1686 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.32,46-49 He died on 29 Mar 1773 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26 Joseph NOYES and Martha CLARKE were married on 10 Nov 1715 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.46,50 The Noyes Descendants, Vol. I says 1715. VR says [Mrs.].

193. Martha CLARKE51 died on 14 Feb 1771 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26 This may be Martha, d. Thomas and Sarah Clark b. Apr. 12, 1696 in Newbury. Joseph NOYES and Martha CLARKE had the following children:

i. Joanna NOYES was born on 28 Jul 1716 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.32,52 The Noyes Descendants, Vol. I says 25 Jul 1716.
ii. Humphrey NOYES53 was born on 11 Feb 1716/17 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.42,54,55 He died on 21 May 1790 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26,42,55,56 He was Farmer.56 Humphrey Noyes joined Capt. Ezekiel Giles' company of volunteers from Plaistow that reinforced the Northern Army at Saratoga. He died in 1790, at the age of seventy-three.

iii. Sarah NOYES was born on 16 Jun 1720 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.52,57
iv. Capt. Thomas NOYES40 was born on 25 Jun 1723 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.26,40,58 He published intentions to marry on 16 Sep 1749.59 He died on 30 Jul 1779 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26 He was selected to call the first town meeting in Atkinson, New Hampshire in 1767 and served as selectman many years; representative to the Legislature. May 11, 1752 was chosen "to clear the spot for the meeting house" (later Plaistow Baptist Church in 1904).
v. Anna NOYES was born on 8 Jun 1726 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.52,60 The Noyes Descendants, Vol. II says 8 June 1727.
vi. Stephen NOYES was born on 13 Sep 1730 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.58,61 He lived in Plaistow, Rockingham, New Hampshire before 1757.44 He died on 18 Feb 1793.26,62 VR Atkinson, NH says Feb 1793. He was also known as Stephen Noyce.44
96 vii. Joseph NOYES.

194. Edward FLINT lived in Hampton, Rockingham, New Hampshire.63 Edward FLINT had the following children:

97 i. Mary FLINT.

198. Stephen LITTLE64 was born on 19 May 1719 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.37,64-66 DAR says 1719. He died on 30 Aug 1793 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.64,65,67 DAR says 1793. The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution
page 218
[p.218] Stephen Little (1719-93) was a member of the general court of Massachusetts 1775. He was born and died in Newbury, Mass. Stephen LITTLE and Judith BAILEY were married on 5 Jun 1743 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.65,68,69 DAR says 1743. VR spells Bayley. Merrick says married on Turkey Hill.

199. Judith BAILEY was born on 15 Feb 1723 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.37,65,68,70 Little says 1724. VR spells Judeth. She died on 9 Aug 1764 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.65,68,71 DAR says 1764. Little and Merrick say 19 Aug 1764. Stephen LITTLE and Judith BAILEY had the following children:

99 i. Judith LITTLE.
ii. Capt. David LITTLE72 was born on 6 Apr 1760 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.72-74 DAR says 1760. He died on 1 Jan 1825 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.72,73,75 DAR says 1825. He was a captain in the militia, held various town offices, served in the legislature, and was a large farmer and extensively interested in real estate at Newburyport and Newbury.

200. Humphrey NOYES53 was born on 11 Feb 1716/17 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.42,54,55 He died on 21 May 1790 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26,42,55,56 He was Farmer.56 Humphrey Noyes joined Capt. Ezekiel Giles' company of volunteers from Plaistow that reinforced the Northern Army at Saratoga. He died in 1790, at the age of seventy-three.
Humphrey NOYES and Elizabeth LITTLE were married on 22 Nov 1743 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.55,56,76

201. Elizabeth LITTLE56 was born on 20 Nov 1720 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.55,56 She died on 15 Apr 1818 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.55,56 Ae. 97 y 5 m. Humphrey NOYES and Elizabeth LITTLE had the following children:

i. Sarah NOYES was born on 3 Feb 1743/44 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26,42,56,59,77 She was baptized on 10 Mar 1744/45 in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts.78 She died on 15 Sep 1831.41,42,77

ii. Jane NOYES was born on 9 Sep 1745/46 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.41,42,59 She was baptized on 14 Sep 1746 in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts.78

iii. Humphrey NOYES29,79 was born on 23 Jan 1745/46 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.79 VR Plaistow, NH says 5/29/1749. He died on 16 May 1814.26,41,79 He was a private in Capt. Giles' company from Plaistow, NH, which joined the Continental army at Saratoga in October 1777. (See NH State Papers, Vol. 15, Revolutionary Pay Rolls, Vol. 2).

iv. Joseph NOYES was born on 7 Dec 1751 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.42 VR Plaistow, NH says 3/5/1750. He died on 22 Nov 1815.42

v. Samuel NOYES80 was born on 25 Aug 1754 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.41,42,59 He died on 9 Jun 1845 in Canaan, Grafton, New Hampshire.81 (Ae. 90y 10m.) Served in the Revolutionary War from Plaistow. Co. Cdr. Ezekiel Giles; Regt. Cdr. Lt.. Col. Jos. Welsh.

In the early part of I834 several energetic citizens of Canaan, and prominent among them was the lawyer, George Kimball, procured subscriptions sufficient to build a house, and to buy half an acre of land, for grounds. It was located in the field next south of the Congregational Meeting House, with an ornamental fence in front. There were sixty contributors to the enterprise, and chief among them stood the venerable farmer, Samuel Noyes, for whom the contemplated school was named. The amount subscribed was $1,000, of which sum only $80 was subscribed by the opponents of the school, and only $20 of that was ever paid, the friends of the school offering at that time to assume the whole $80. Application was made to the legislature for a charter which was granted July 4, 1834, to Samuel Noyes, George Kimball, Nathaniel Currier, George Walworth and John H. Harris, as incorporators of Noyes Academy. The charter provided for the "education of youth." That the corporation could hold estate not to exceed $15,000, to be divided into one thousand shares of $15 each. Property by way of gift could be held to any amount.


100 vi. Peter NOYES.
vii.

John NOYES Esq.82-85 was born on 2 Apr 1764 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.41,86,87 He graduated in 1795 in Dartmouth College, Hanover, Grafton, New Hampshire.41,84,87 He died on 26 Oct 1841 in Putney, Windham, Vermont.41,84,86-88 He was buried in Putney, Windham, Vermont.82,83 Maple Grove Cemetery. NOYES, John, a Representative from Vermont; born in Atkinson, Rockingham County, N.H., April 2, 1764; attended private schools, and was graduated from Dartmouth College, Hanover, N.H., in 1795; tutor at Chesterfield (N.H.) Academy 1795-1797 and at Dartmouth College 1797-1799, having among his pupils Daniel Webster at the latter institution; studied theology; moved to Brattleboro, Vt., in 1800 and engaged in mercantile pursuits; member of the State house of representatives 1808-1810 and in 1812; moved to Dummesston in 1812 and resumed his mercantile pursuits; held several local offices in Vermont; elected as a Federalist to the Fourteenth Congress (March 4, 1815-March 3, 1817); resumed mercantile pursuits until 1819, when he retired from active life and settled on a farm near Putney, where he died October 26, 1841; interment in Maple Grove Cemetery, Putney, Vt.

Political Graveyard: Born in New Hampshire. U.S. Representative from Vermont, 1815-17. Interment at Maple Grove Cemetery, Putney, Vt.

Men of Vermont

Noyes, John. Representative in Congress 1815-'17, and for years one of the leading business men of the southeast part of the state. He was born at Atkinson, N. H., a descendant of one of the early settlers of Massachusetts, and of an unusually learned and scholarly family. He was graduated at Dartmouth in 1795, and became a tutor there, and had among his pupils Daniel Webster, who in after life admitted his debt intellectually to the tutor. Mr. Noyes engaged in theological study and fitted himself for the ministry, but gave it up because of ill-health and returned to teaching, had [p.144] charge of the Chesterfield, N. H., Academy for a time, and in 1800 moved to Brattleboro to engage in mercantile trade with General Mann, the grandfather of the wife of Gen. George B. McClellan. There were several famous connections through the firm of Noyes & Mann. A partner of one of its branches, at Wilmington, was Rutherford, father of President Rutherford B. Hayes. Mr. Noyes' oldest son was John H. Noyes, founder of the Oneida, N. Y., Perfectionist community, which had its first start at Putney. His eldest daughter was Mrs. L. G. Mead, mother of the famous sculptor of that name.

The firm did a heavy business, with stores at Brattleboro, Wilmington, Whitingham and Putney, and rapidly amassed wealth.

Mr. Noyes represented Brattleboro in the General Assembly of 1808-'10 and 1812, and in 1815 was elected to Congress, serving one term as contemporary with Clay, Randolph and other celebrities. On his return from Washington he moved to Dummerston, where he lived for four years, and then retired from active life to a farm in Putney, where he died Oct. 26, 1841, at the age of seventy-eight. He wedded, in 1804, Polly, the oldest daughter of Rutherford Hayes, the grandfather of the President.


202. Enoch NOYES was born on 25 Mar 1730 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.42,89 He published intentions to marry on 15 Feb 1751.59 He died on 24 Jan 1796.26 Enoch NOYES and Judith KNIGHT were married on 5 Jul 1759.26,42 "Noyes Descendents" says 1759.

203. Judith KNIGHT died on 30 May 1772.26 Enoch NOYES and Judith KNIGHT had the following children:

i. Lieut. James NOYES90 was born on 16 Apr 1760 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26,59,91 He died on 18 Jul 1817.26,91 He was a sergeant in Capt. Ezekial Gile's Company which marched from Plaistow to join in the Northern Continental Army at Saratoga in October, 1777.

ii. NOYES was born on 19 Aug 1761 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26 She died on 20 Aug 1761.26

iii. Enoch NOYES was born on 30 Sep 1762 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26,59 He died on 21 Jan 1764 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26

iv. Judith NOYES was born on 2 Mar 1764 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.42 VR Atkinson and Plaistow, NH says 6/28/1764. She died on 4 Nov 1793.26,42

v. Phebe NOYES was born on 21 Mar 1766 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26,42,59

vi. Sarah NOYES.

vii. Mary NOYES was born on 31 Aug 1770 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26 She died on 14 Oct 1770 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.26

204. David PEABODY28 was born. David PEABODY had the following children:

i. Josiah Gaines PEABODY.

206. Moses GREENOUGH was born. Moses GREENOUGH and Mary CALEF were married.28

207. Mary CALEF was born. Moses GREENOUGH and Mary CALEF had the following children:

i. Edna GREENOUGH.



Ninth Generation

384. Lieut. Colonel James B. NOYES46,92,93 was born on 16 May 1657 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.47,48,54,92,94-100 Noyes Genealogy, Reminiscences of a Newburyport Nonagenarian, Colonial Families and Noyes Pedigree all incorrectly say 11 May 1657. He signed a will on 22 Apr 1723 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.92,97 His will names his wife Hannah, his sons Joseph, Nicholas, Nathan, Ephraim, Benjamin and James, his daughters Rebecca, wife of Joseph Knight, Hannah, wife of Benjamin Lunt, Lydia, wife of Joseph Dole, and Mary Noyes. In his will, he gave his son Joseph his "silver headed staff and silver hilted rapier." His son Nicholas was the residuary legatee and executor. The estate was large, the real estate property valued at £2140 and the personalty at £640. [Essex Probate, 315:223]. He died after 22 Apr 1723 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.48,92,96,98 Noyes Pedigree says 1723. Will (proved) on 8 May 1725.92,97 He was a Major and Lieutenant Colonel in the militia.92 According to "Col. Fam.", "...was Major & Lieut. Col. in the Militia..."

He was called Lieutenant Colonel in the town records. He discovered the first limestone in the colony at Newbury, and the discovery is said to have created great excitement.

On 10 April 1718, "Simon French and Abigail his wife both of Salisbury" sold to "our brothers Cutting Noyes and James Noyes in equal degrees all our right, title and interest in the estate of our late brother the Reverend Mr. Nicholas Noyes late of Salem ... deceased" [ELR 33:221-22]. Lieut. Colonel James B. NOYES and Hannah KNIGHT were married on 31 Mar 1684 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.47,48,76,92,96-98,100-105 (Noyes says 1683.)

385. Hannah KNIGHT was born on 30 Aug 1664 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.101,102,106 She died on 25 Sep 1745 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.107 Lieut. Colonel James B. NOYES and Hannah KNIGHT had the following children:


i. Rebecca NOYES was born on 12 Jan 1684/85 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.46-49,108 Noyes' Genealogy says 6/12/1685.

i. Joseph NOYES.

iii. Hannah NOYES was born on 13 Mar 1687/88 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.46-49,109 She published intentions to marry Benjamin Lunt on 16 Jan 1712/13 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.104 She died on 31 Mar 1744 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.110-112

iv. Nicholas NOYES was born on 9 Feb 1689/90 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.47-49,52,113 The Noyes Descendants, Vol. I says 19 Feb 1689/90. He died before 1 Oct 1740.52

v. Nathan NOYES was born on 5 Feb 1691/92 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.47-49,113-115 On 30 May 1736 he was admitted as a church member at !st Church in Falmouth, York, Massachusetts [Maine].115

vi. Ephraim NOYES47 was born on 20 Nov 1694 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.47-49,109 He died on 19 Dec 1694 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.48,49,116 VR spells Ephiam. Died three weeks after birth

vii. Lydia NOYES was born on 30 Nov 1695 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.47-49,117 Newbury VR says Nov. ult., 1695.

viii. Capt. Ephraim NOYES49,114 was born on 25 Dec 1698 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.47-49,109,114 He died on 5 Apr 1779 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.114,116 Ae. 80 y. 3 m. 10 d. He was also known as Ephraim Noyce.118 VR for marriage. Settled on the main road in the West Precinct, Newbury.

Estate was inventoried at £6,240.
ix. Benjamin NOYES119 was born on 22 Feb 1700/1 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.46-49,120 Will of Benjamin Noyes of Plaistow, NH, made 15 Feb., 1770.

"I, Benjamin Noyes of Plaistow, in the Province of N.H. in New England - Yeoman - Knowing that it is appointed for all men to die - do make and Ordain this my last Will and Testament; that is - to say, principally, and first of all. I, give and Recommend my Soul into the Hands of God that gave it, and my Body, I recomment to the Earth to be Buried in a decent Christian manner of Burial at the Discretion of my Executors, Nothing doubting but at the general Reserrection I shall receive the same again by the Mighty Power of God. And as touching such Worldly Estate wherewith it has pleased God to Bless me, in this Life. I, give and Demise in of the same in Manner and form following-"

"I give and bequeath to Sarah my dearly Beloved wife, all my Personal estate, after my debts are paid - she to take care of the young children."

"I have already given my beloved son Benjamin, his portion of my estate, which was a trade, and an acre of land in Salisbury. "To my son Phillip 26 shillings Lawful Money in addition to what I have already given him, to be paid him by my sons James and Joseph, when he shall have arrived to 21 years."

"To my dau. Mary Smith 6 shillings in addition to what I have given her, to be paid her when Phillip is 21 by James and Joseph."

"To my dau. Elizabeth Huntington 6 shillings in addition to what I have given her, to be paid her when Phillip is 21 by James & Joseph."

"To my dau. Lydia Noyes £2, 8s. 8d. to be paid her when Phillip is 21 by James & Joseph."

To my dau. Sarah £4 &c-.

To my sons James and Joseph all my real estate in Plaistow equally between them.

Will proved Feb. 19, 1783.

Children born in Newbury and Salisbury MA and Plaistow, NH.


x. Mary NOYES was born on 13 Mar 1703/4 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.46-49,117 Noyes' Genealogy says 3/3/1703.

xi. Capt. James NOYES55 was born on 19 Aug 1705 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.46-49,54,55 He died before 1757. They removed to Plaistow, N.H. Administration on his estate granted to son Enoch in June 1758.

xii. Ebenezer NOYES was born in Dec 1706 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.121 He died on 9 Jan 1707 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.122

396. Moses LITTLE was born on 26 Feb 1691 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.37,123,124 He died on 17 Oct 1780 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.123 Moses LITTLE and Sarah JAQUES were married on 12 Feb 1716/17.125

397. Sarah JAQUES was born on 23 Sep 1697 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.125,126 Moses LITTLE and Sarah JAQUES had the following children:


i. Lydia LITTLE was born on 25 Aug 1717 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.127 She died on 5 Feb 1798 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.128 Ae. 80 y. 6 m.

ii. Stephen LITTLE.

iii. John LITTLE was born on 16 Nov 1721 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.129

iv. Moses LITTLE68 was born on 8 May 1724 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.68,124 DAR says 1724 in Newbury. He died in 1798 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.68 Moses Little (1724-98) commanded a regiment at Bunker Hill and was at Flatbush Pass in the disastrous battle of Long Island. He was at Harlem Heights, but ill health compelled him to leave the field. He represented Newbury in the general court. He was born and died in Newbury.

v. Joseph LITTLE was born on 21 Apr 1730 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.38,130 He died on 1 Feb 1792.130

vi. Benjamin LITTLE131 was born on 4 Nov 1732 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.132 He died on 18 Apr 1777.133 He lived in Hampstead, Rockingham, New Hampshire.133

vii. Sarah LITTLE was born in Apr 1735 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.134

viii. Mary LITTLE was born on 25 Oct 1737 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.127

ix. Paul LITTLE was born on 1 Apr 1740 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.124

398. Joshua BAYLEY135 died on 6 Oct 1762.136,137 Joshua BAYLEY and Sarah COFFIN were married on 4 Feb 1706/7.136,138,139

399. Sarah COFFIN was born on 16 May 1686 in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts.136,138,139 She died on 27 Nov 1768.136,138 Joshua BAYLEY and Sarah COFFIN had the following children:


i. Stephen BAILEY was born on 1 Mar 1708 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.140 He died on 2 Jul 1797 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.140

ii. Judith BAILEY.

iii. Gen. Jacob BAILEY\BAYLEY Sr.141,142 was born on 19 Jul 1726 in West Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.135,136,142,143 He died on 1 Mar 1815 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.136,142-144 He was also known as Jacob Bailey.135 Jacob Bayley, (1726-1815), who had served in the early wars, was appointed brigadier general of militia, 1776. He was a member of the Committee of Safety and of the first Governor's Council of Vermont. He was born in Newbury, Mass., and died in Newbury, Vt. His son Jacob acted as scout and served through the war.

Men of Vermont

Bayley, Gen. Jacob. Washington's most trusted officer in Vermont, who had charge of the protection of the frontier for several years, and who was at different times an advocate of the claims of New York, of the new state, and of New Hampshire to the territory of Vermont, was born at Newbury, Mass., July 2, 1728. He was a captain in the French war in 1736, present at the Fort William Henry massacre in 1757, from which he escaped, and was a colonel under Amherst in the taking of Crown Point and Ticonderoga in 1759. He came to Newbury, Vt., in October, 1764, was in 1775 elected to the New York Provincial Congress, though he did not take his seat, and was one of the most influential men of that part of the state. He was commissioner to administer oaths of office, judge of inferior court of common pleas, and justice of the peace; August 1, 1776, he was appointed brigadier-general of the militia of Cumberland and Gloucester counties, and in 1776 he began work on the celebrated Hazen road, afterward completed by General Hazen, which was designed as a military road from the Connecticut river to St. Johns, Canada.


"Gen. Jacob Bayley settled first at Hampstead, N.H. in 1748, and raised a company of which he was captain at the commencement of the French and Indian War, 1756. He was at the capture of Fort William Henry and ran the guantlet at the dreadful massacre that occurred by the violation of the plighted faith of the enemy, in August 1757, and was one of those who escaped to Fort Edward. He was commissioned Colonel by General Amherst, and was with him at the taking of Fort Ticonderoga and Crown Point in 1759. Standing high in government favor for his military service, he was in 1763 given a charter for a township in Vermont, and removed to Newbury in that state in 1764. He was there appointed brigadier-general, and soon after, by General Washington, commissary-general of the Northern department of the army, a position which involved great responsibilities, and subjected him to dangers, difficulties and sacrifices of an extraordianry character. A reward of five hundred guineas was offered for his capture, dead or alive, and it required constant vigilance to escape the scouts sent from Canada to take him. He made a treaty with the St. Francis tribe of Indians, and was looked up to as a father by them and by the friendly Indians. By means of spies he acquired important intelligence respecting the movements of the British, and rendered great service with his purse, pen and person before and at the time of the capture of Burgoyne. Several of his sons served with him against the British. He sacrificed a large estate in the service of his country for which he never received any compensation. He was judge of probate for Newbury district [VT] in 1778, chief judge of Orange County Court [VT] from 1781 to 1791, excepting the years 1783 and 1784.

Gen. Jacob Bayley has most appropriately been called the "father of Newbury, Vt." for he was [not] only the original grantee but also the pioneer mover in most of the important early enterprises connected with its settlement. See Well's History of Newbury, Vt. for a very full and interesting account of his life.
----------------------------------------------------
There is much confusion regarding these dates [this statement follows a listing of the birthdates of his children which I've not included here].

Book I, Hampstead records, has been followed as closely as possible. After Jacob Bayley settled in Hampstead, he became at once active in church and town affairs, and soon showed himself worthy to lead. The town records show that in March 1746, Jacob Bayley had a pew in the meeting house next to Lieut. James Graves' at the left hand of the ally in ye miner tear.' In 1752 the meeting house was apparently still incomplete, and it is recorded that Jacob Bayley bought two pews. He served twice as moderator at the town meetings. He was selectman in 1749, 1756, 1761 and 1762. To be a pewholder at the age of twenty shows a maturity beyond his years. To be elected as selectman at the age of twenty-three is no small distinction.

It is interesting to note that his memory is still kept green in the town of Hampstead, not by monument of stone bronze, but by a living tree, a beautiful and stately elm on the farm where he lived while a resident of the town. It is known as the General Bayley Elm, and it was growing when he lived there. It is nineteen feet in circumference at a distance of two feet above the ground.

During the week of Aug. 11-16, 1912, was observed the one hundred fiftieth anniversary of the settlement of Newbury, Vt. of which the town, as aforesaid, General Jacob Bayley was the pioneer, father and founder; the most historical patriot of that region, and the illustrious ancestor of a considerable proportion of its present population. Believing that too long his valuable and self-sacrificing service to his town, state and country had not been fittingly and enduringly recognized, a movement led by Hon. Edwin A. Bayley of Boston, and others of Gen. Bayley's descendants, had resulted in the erection upon Newbury Common of a beautiful granite monument, which was dedicated with appropriate ceremonies upon the afternoon of Aug. 13. Hon. Mr. Bayley's address upon that occassion, which was spirited and masterly, together with the entire anniversary exercises of the week, may be found in the printed reports of the celebration deposited in many of the large libraries, to which the interested reader is referred. The limitations of this work prevent a full summary of the public life and services of Gen. Bayley, conspicuous in his time for special qualities that have given him a place in history, and, better still, in the hearts and lives of his descendants.

The qualities which made Bayley great were so little paraded for the admiration of the world that it is only now that they are coming to their full recognition. His love of country, patience, clear vision of the end that must be sought and real tenacity in seeking it through all discouragements, his unselfish devotion of effort and estate, made him the necessary man of his day, and his light shines brighter with the passing years. In the varied experiences of his life as pioneer, soldier, statesman, leader of the people in a great emergency, he attained a well-rounded character of power, courage, and balanced judgment, with great and deep convictions, combining courage for action with wisdom to avoid ill-considered venturings. The inscriptions upon the monument embodying the salient points of Gen. Bayley's life and work are: --

Front ---East View West View
JACOB BAYLEY A Leading Citizen of Hampstead
1726 -- 1815 New Hampshire 1746 - 1764.
- - - - - - - - Founder of this Town 1762
A Pioneer Secured its First Charter from
New Hampshire 1763, its Second
From New York, 1772
Founder of First Church 1764
And One of its First Two Deacons
Of Strong Unselfish Purpose Delegate to New York
Provincial Congress 1777,
A Patriot Representative to Vermont
General Assembly 1777 and 1784,
Of Uncompromising Fidelity Member of Council of Safety 1777,
of Court of Confiscation 1777,
A Soldier of Constitutional Conventions 1777 and
1793,
Judge of Court of Common Pleas
Unstained by Personal Ambition 1772 -- 1777
Delegate to Continental Congress 1777,
A Citizen Judge of Probate Court 1778,
Chief Judge of Supreme Court
Ever Devoted to the Public Good. Of Gloucester County 1778
- - - - - - - - Chief Judge of Orange County Court
Patriot 1783, 1786 -- 1791
Member of Governor's Council
Ten Terms 1778, 1786-1794
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Citizen
- - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

North View South View
French and Indian War
"I Have Nothing Left but My Farm, _____________
All Else I have Advanced for the Public, Lieutenant 1755, Captain 1757,
and I Think it Well Spent if I Have Colonel 1760
Done any Good." ____________
Siege of Fort William Henry,
Battles of
To Perpetuate Ticonderoga and Crown Point
The Memory of His Distinguished Capture of Montreal.
And Self-sacrificing Services - ___________
for His Town Revolutionary War
His State and His Country, Brigadier General 1776
This Monument is Erected Commissary General of Northern
in the Year 1912 Department of Colonial Army 1777
By Some of His Descendants. - - __________
- - - - - - - - - -- Battle of Saratoga.
Pioneer "I am Determined to Fight for
- - - - - - - - - The United States as Long as I Live
And Have One Copper in my Hands." - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - _________
Soldier


SOURCE -- Bayley, Edwin A. & Bailey, Gertrude E., Bayley-Bailey Family -- John of Salisbury Branch; Account of John Bayly of Salisbury, Mass., and some of his Descendants. Vol. I at pp. 60-62, edited by Hollis R. Bailey, Boston, Mass. & founded upon the 1899 compilation of Mrs. Abbie F. Ellsworth (1932).

He was, in the early years of the struggle between the settlers and New York, one of the most trusted representatives of the authority of the latter, but suddenly changed [p.62] his position in 1777, writing to the New York council under date of June 14, acknowledging the receipt of ordinance for the election of Governor, Senators and Representatives and saying: I am apt to think our people will not choose any member to sit in the state of New York. The people before they saw the constitution were not willing to trouble themselves about a separation from the state of New York, but now almost to a man they are violent for it. He had earlier been chosen by the convention one of the delegates to present Vermont's remonstrance and petition to the Continental Congress, and he was one of the two representatives from Newbury in the Windsor convention of July 17, 1777, that framed the constitution. Less than a year and a half afterwards, he was a leader in the scheme of the Connecticut River towns on both sides of the river to join together and form a new state, and was chairman of the committee that issued, Dec. 1, 1778, a long public defense of their right to do so. In less than two years from that time he was an emphatic and headlong advocate of New Hampshire's jurisdiction over the whole of Vermont, and Nov. 22, 1780, wrote to President Weare of New Hampshire: For my part I am determined to fight for New Hampshire and the United States as long as I am alive and have one copper in my hand.

But, notwithstanding his erratic state politics, he was unflinchingly faithful to the continental cause, and his later state flops were largely due to his suspicions of the Allens. He warned Washington repeatedly that there was treason afoot. We have half a dozen rascals here, he said, and in 1781 he fully believed that Vermont had been sold out to Canada. British emissaries in the state wrote to Haldimand in that year, that he had been employed by Congress at great expense to counteract underhand whatever is doing for government. He was in 1780 intensely anxious to lead an invasion into Canada the harbor for spoils, thieves, and robbers, as he wrote President Weare. He thought then that the patriot cause was sinking so fast as to make the attempt a vital necessity whatever the risk. He did important service throughout the war in guarding the extensive frontier of two hundred miles, keeping friendship with the Indians, and keeping them employed for the American cause so far as he could. He was in this way constantly in confidential communication with Washington to the end of the war. He was repeatedly waylaid while in the performance of his arduous duties, his house rifled and his papers stolen by the bands of both scouts and lawless men that roamed the forests between the hostile countries. He was a commissary-general during a part of the war.

He was a member of the famous Council of Safety in 1777, and the next spring was elected to the Governor's Council. He was at Castleton in military service in 1777, but appears to have been acting under his New York commission. For the next few years the Vermonters had no use for him, but in 1793 he was again elected councilor by a close margin over John White. He repeatedly represented his town in the Legislature, and was a judge of Orange county court after that county was organized.

He died at Newbury, March 1, 1816. He was married, Oct. 16, 1745, to Prudence Noyes. They had ten children, and their descendants have been numerous and respectable.

400. is the same as person number 192.

401. is the same as person number 193.

402. Tristram LITTLE145 was born on 9 Dec 1681 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.66,123 He died on 11 Nov 1765 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.67 (Ae. 83 y.) Tristram LITTLE and Sarah DOLE were married on 30 Oct 1707 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.146,147

403. Sarah DOLE145 was born on 12 Feb 1689/90 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.148,149 She died in 1780 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.107 Tristram LITTLE and Sarah DOLE had the following children:

i. Sarah LITTLE was born on 6 Aug 1708 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.55,134,150 She died on 29 May 1754 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.151

ii. Henry LITTLE was born on 31 Dec 1710 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.129 He died on 25 Nov 1786 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.107

iii. Samuel N. LITTLE56 was born on 18 Feb 1712/13 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.55,56,134 He lived in Falmouth, York, Massachusetts [Maine] after 1736.56 He lived in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire in 1741.56 He died on 29 Sep 1792 in Newbury Hill, Merrimack, New Hampshire.55,56 He was Shoemaker.56 Served in the earlier part of the Revolution and was a quartermaster.

iv. Apphia LITTLE was born before 19 Jun 1715 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.132 She died on 15 Feb 1742/43 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.152

v. Jane LITTLE was born on 6 Jun 1718 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.107 She died in 1748 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.107

vi. Elizabeth LITTLE.

vii. Nathaniel LITTLE was born on 24 May 1723 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.124 He died on 13 Nov 1745 in Louisburg, Nova Scotia, Canada.107 (Enlisted in the expedition against Louisburg, Cape Breton and died there; ae. 22y 4m 24d.)

viii. Richard LITTLE41 was born on 6 Jun 1725 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.41,55,124 He died on 13 Feb 1806 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.41,55,128 He was Shoemaker.41 He studied navigation and made several short voyages but the most of his life was engaged in farming.

ix. Enoch LITTLE153,154 was born on 21 May 1728 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.55,155 He died on 21 Oct 1816 in Boscawen, Merrimack, New Hampshire.55,155 He was buried after 21 Oct 1816 in Boscawen, Merrimack, New Hampshire.154 (Corser Hill Cemetery.) Mr. Little was a weaver and shoemaker; and lived near the Upper Green in Newbury until 1766, when he removed to Hampstead, N. H., and in 1774 to Boscawen, N. H., where he subsequently lived. In Boscawen, he settled in an unbroken forest, and endured all the privations of the wilderness. He had become a convert under the preaching of Rev. George Whitefield, at Newburyport, at the age of eleven, and was admitted a member of the old South church in Newburyport, while living at Hampstead. After his removal to Boscawen, he went annually to Newburyport to attend the August communion until he became too feeble.

Enoch Little Sr. was a member of the old South Church of Newbury, MA. NSDAR recognized him for Public Service in the American Revolution from NH.

x. Mary LITTLE was born on 4 Feb 1730/31 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.55,127 (Died young.)

xi. John LITTLE was born on 14 Jul 1735 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.55,115,129,145,155,156 He died on 25 Aug 1800 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.55,71,115,145,155-157 (Ae. 65 y.) He was Farmer & Carpenter.145

404. Capt. James NOYES55 was born on 19 Aug 1705 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.46-49,54,55 He died before 1757. They removed to Plaistow, N.H. Administration on his estate granted to son Enoch in June 1758. Capt. James NOYES and Sarah LITTLE were married on 30 May 1729 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.55,76,147,150

405. Sarah LITTLE was born on 6 Aug 1708 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.55,134,150 She died on 29 May 1754 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.151 Capt. James NOYES and Sarah LITTLE had the following children:

202
i. Enoch NOYES.

ii. Sarah NOYES42 was born in Jan 1735 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.57

iii. Mary NOYES was born on 21 Dec 1742 in Plaistow, Rockingham, New Hampshire.59 She died on 26 Oct 1823.42,158

iv. Capt. James NOYES29,159 was born on 23 Mar 1744/45 in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.160 VR, Plaistow, NH says 3/17/1744. He died on 31 Dec 1831.42,159 He was Farmer.159 He lived in Atkinson, Rockingham, New Hampshire.159 Revolutionary War Private from Plaistow: Co. Cdr. Ezekiel Giles.Served in the French and Indian war.

v. Nathaniel NOYES160,161 was born on 21 Dec 1747 in Atkinson, Piscataquis, Maine.160 VR, Plaistow, NH says 12/10/1747. He lived in Boscawen, Merrimack, New Hampshire in 1776.160 He lived in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts after 1776.160 He lived in Landaff, Grafton, New Hampshire before 1813.160 He died on 7 Apr 1813 in Landaff, Grafton, New Hampshire.160,161 Ae. 66 y. He is credited with service in the Revolution, having served as a private in Capt. Emery's company of Col. Baldwin's regiment, at White Plains, N.Y. When he moved to Landaff he cleared the land of his farm and built a log house, in which he lived several years. It is related that he raised grain and grass, and that it was his custom each winter to take a load to Portland with an ox team, and bring home a year's supply of groceries. A great snow storm detained him on one trip, and several days passed before he could reach home. His wife, a large, robust woman, getting out of fuel, cut down large birches into fire wood.

The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution
page 338
Nathaniel Noyes (1747-1813) served as a private in Captain Emery's company, Colonel Baldwin's regiment, at White Plains. He was born in Atkinson, N. H.; died in Landoff.


vi. Eunis NOYES was born on 1 Jul 1750 in Plaistow, Rockingham, New Hampshire.59

Monday, August 4, 2008

10th Generation Noyes

Tenth Generation

768. Deacon Nicholas NOYES99,162-165 was born about 1616 in Cholderton, Wiltshire, England.47,93,95,96,164,166-171 (NEHG Register, Vol. 149 says about 1614 (aged "about 60" in 1674 according to Ipswich Deeds 4:187).

Reminiscences of a Nonagenarian says 1614.

Noyes Pedigree says 1615/16

The Great Migration says about 1616.) He emigrated on 24 Mar 1633/34 from Southampton, Hampshire, England.164,171-174 (Sailed on ship Mary & John of London, Robert Sayres, Master, on 23 Mar. 1634 with brother James and sister-in-law Sarah. The ship was detained in the Thames where all passengers signed the oath of allegiance to the king and the church 24 Mar. 1634, before they were allowed to sail from London.

"Nicholas Noyce" was enrolled at Southampton as a passenger for New England on the Mary & John [Drake's Founders 70].) He immigrated in May 1634 to Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts.171 He lived in Ipswich, Essex, Massachusetts after May 1634.164 (Medford was first known as Mistick.) He lived in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts in May 1635.164,175,176 He signed a will on 4 Jul 1700 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.164,167,177,178 (In the Name of God and by His Assistance I, Nicholas Noyes, of Newbery, in ye County of Essex in ye Province of ye Massachusets Bay in New England do humbly Comitt my soul body and Spirit both in life and death unto ye everlasting armes of God Alsufficient my Heavenly Father and unto Jesus Christ my alone Savior & Redeemer thro ye power & presence of his eternall Spiritt my body to ye earth whence itt Originall was taken in hopes of a happy and glorious Resurrection on ye Great day of ye man Christ Jesus to him be glory both now and Ever Amen. And for my Worldly goods I do dispose as is hereafter expressed.

Impr. To ye children of my Son John Noyes (late of Newbery Dec'ed) I give that meadow & upland wch they now posses in my neck of land (excepting only twenty acres of upland next to Henry Shorts Mills wch I do reserve to be otherwise disposed of for fifety pounds wch he oweth me) always reserving liberty for my heirs for ever to pass & repass thro any of ye aforesd lands at Sumer or Winter on ye place or places where we ware wont to pass & repass and further wth upland & meadow is contained in this my gift more than was Inventorized in my said Son John his inventory I do give to my grandson Nicholas Noyes the son of my said son John Noyes over and above his portion I do also reserve to my Self all those points of upland wch run into ye said meadow and are now on my side of ye deviding fence betwene my self and my said sons childrens land.

Item, To my son Mr. Nicholas Noyes of Salem I give five shillings in money besides what I have formerly done for him wch is in full of his portion to be paid by my executor.

Item To my son Cutting Noyes I give five shillings in money besides wt I have done formerly for him to be paid by my executors in full of his Portion.

Item. To my son Timothy Noyes I give all that houseing and land that he now posseseth also one acre of plowland out of ye land that I myself now posses to be laid out by ye side of ye said Plow land that he now posseseth also about Two acres of Plow land and Swamp be itt more or less wch layeth betwene ye land that Moses Little late of Newbery did posses and ye land of Joseph Knight & my owne land and ye land of Lt. Tristram Coffin, also all that my long point of meadow or salt marsh in my neck of land as itt is bounded by ye Mill River on three sides, and ye other side by a line running streight from Henry Shorts Mill dam to ye turne of ye River yt makes ye said point of marsh, also ye one halfe of that marsh wch I formerly bought of Henry Jaques lying in ye great marshes in Newbery also ye one halfe of that twenty acres of upland on my Neck before reserved in this my Will. Also one Quarter part of all my devisions of land already laid out in ye upper Woods in Newbery to me; as also one Quarter parts of all my rights in ye undevided lands of Newbery all wch to enjoy to him and his heirs forever. Also I give unto him all my weareing apparrell I also confirm to him all yt piece of Meadow wch he bought of Peter Cheny lyeing on ye South Side of ye Mill River in Newbery.

Item To ye children of my son Thomas Noyes dec'ed I give ten pounds to be paid by my executor in good Currant pay as itt passeth from man to man (not as money) to be paid to ye children when they come of age or sooner as my executor shall see cause.

Item. To my daughter Mary ye wife of John French of Salisbury besides what I have formerly given her I give her fiveteen pounds in good currant pay as itt passeth from man to man (not as money) to be paid by my executor wth in four years after my death wch is for full of her portion.

Item. To my daughter Hannah ye wife of John Atkinson Sen'r. of Newbery I give five shillings money besides what I have formerly to her to be paid by my Executor wch is in full of her portion.

Item. To my daughter Sarah ye wife of Matthew Pettengall of Newbery besides what I have formerly given her I do now give her fifeteen pounds in good marchentable pay not as money price but as it passeth from man to man to be paid by my executor wth in four years after my death wch is in full of her portion.

Item To my daughter Rachel the wife of James Jackman of Newbery I give fifeteen pounds besides what I formerly gave her to be paid by my Executor wth in four years after my death in good marchentable pay not in or as money but as it passeth from man to man wch is in full of her portion.

Item. To my daughter Abigall Noyes I give all ye linen that I shall have in the house at my decease as Table Linnen & Sheets as also ye best bed wth all ye furniture, also ye parlour dureing her naturall life as also seller room for her convenciency (the house room here mentioned she shall not have itt if she marry also I give her fifety Shillings per Annum dureing her naturall life to be paid to her by my Executor ten shillings of itt in money or in flax or Wool at money price annually and the ye other forty shillings in provision pay at money prices annually my Executor to keep ye said Parlour in good repair at his owne charge. Also I give to her ye fruits of ten Apple trees yearly if she do not marry to be at her owne choyce out of my old orchard. I also give my said daughter one of my brass kettles at her owne choyce & one iron pott & three platters and my tankard all wch is in full of her portion.

Item. I do hereby make my son James Noyes my true and lawful heir and do accordingly give and bequeath unto him and to his heirs & assignes forever all my houseing & lands wth all my goods & chattles (not perticularly mentioned in this my last Will and Textamt & otherwise disposed of) together wth all debts due to me by Bill Bond Book or otherwise, as also whatever may be mine and may appear due to me in time to come requireing him to pay all my honest debts & in speciall four pounds in money to his brother Mr. Nicholas Noyes of Salem on the accott. of Maj. Thomas Noyes of Newbery Esqr. as also Twenty shillings to ye First Church in Newbery, my funerall charges to be by him discharged.

Lastly. I do appoint my son James Noyes to be ye executor of this my last Will Will and Testament hereby revoaking all former wills of mine. Whereas I have in this my last Will confered certaine lands on ye children of my son John Noyes itt is to be understood that Mary ye Widow of my said son John shall enjoy her thirds of said houseing & lands dureing her naturall life. In Witness whereof I, ye said Nicholas Noyes have hereto as my last Will & Testament sett to my hand & Seal this fourth day of July Anno Dom one thousand & seaven hundred.

Nicholas Noyes & a Seal.
Signed, sealed & Declared by Mr. Nicholas Noyes to be his last Will & Testamt in presence of us.

Henry Short Junr.
Jonathan Emory.
Joseph Knight
John Short.
Henry Short.
Will proved Dec. 29, 1701.

[Essex Probate Record, 307:233-36 at Salem].

The inventory of the "estate of Mr. Nicholas Noyes late of Newbery who deceased November 23rd 1701," totalled £1531 4s., of which £1160 was real estate: "36 acres of land with houses, outhouses, gardens & orchard thereupon," £500; "eighty acres of meadow & sixty acres of upland," £500; "the outlands namely a freehold lot of about 30 acres and a rate lot of about seventy acres," £140; and "rights in the commons & undivided lands of Newbery," £20. Taken by Thomas Noyes, Joseph Woodbridge and Henry Short [EQC 307:236].) He died on 23 Nov 1701 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.49,95,99,164,167,170,179 (Savage, Vol. 3, p.298 and History of Brunswick, Topsham, and Harpswell: Died 11/9/1701.
NEHG Register, Vol. 149 says "Mr. Nicholas Noyes of Newbury, aged about 86 years, died on the Lords-Day 9r 23.1701" ("The Diary of Samuel Sewall 1674-1729, M. Halsey Thomas, ed. (2 vols., New York, 1973), 1:458.) He was buried on 23 Nov 1701 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.168,169 Will (proved) on 29 Dec 1701.164,167 Nicholas Noyes was born in Cholderton, co. Wilts, about 1616. He deposed 27 November 1671 "aged about fifty-five years" [Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, Massachusetts, 1536-1686 (EQC) 4:433]; deposed 24 December 1674 "aged about sixty" [Ipswich Land Records (ILR) 4:187]; deposed 31 March 1679 "aged sixty-three years" [EQC 7:165].

He married by 1641 Mary Cutting, daughter of John Cutting of Watertown.

What was evidently a family group of six, having decided to go to New England, took the Oath of Allegiance - John Woodbridge, George Brown, Nicholas Noyes, and Richard Brown - on March 24, 1633/34, Thomas Parker and James Noyes on March 26, 1634 - and all embarked on the Mary and John at Southampton, reaching Nantasket (now Hull) near Boston sometime in May 1634 and removed to Agwam (Ipswich) where they remained during the following winter. The Rev. Parker and friends remained in Ipswich until the following spring when they applied to the General Court for liberty to settle on the Quascacunquen in an area known as Wessacucon. May 6, 1635, the following orders were passed by the General Court:

- Wessacucon is allowed by the court to be a plantation & it is refered to Mr. Humfry, Mr. Endicott, Capt. Turner and Capt. Trask or any three of them, to sett out the bounds of Ipswich & Wessacucon or so much thereof as they can & the name of the said plantation in changed & hereafter to be called Neweberry.

Most of the passengers who came to New England in the ship "Mary & John" were induced to remove to Newbury early in the year 1635. Tradition asserts that they came by water from Ipswich and landed on the north shore of the Quascacunquen (now Parker) river, about two or three hundred rods below the bridge that connects the "Lower Green" with the "Great Neck" and the town of Rowley. A monument marks the spot where the settlers disembarked in May or June, 1635. Tradition states that young Nicholas was the first person to leap ashore when their boat anchored in the Quascacumquen (now the Parker) River. [John J. Currier, "History of Newbury" p.312; Sarah Anna Emery "Reminiscences of a Nonagenarian" p.112]. They joined 23 men and their families who formed a cattle-breeding company and were among the first settlers at Newbury where their children were born. Newbury's first minister was a cousin, Thomas Parker.

Rev. Nicholas Noyes, in his account of his uncle, Rev. James Noyes, told of the coming of Mr. Parker, Mr. Noyes and his younger brother Nicholas Noyes, a single man, adding "between which three was more than ordinary endearment of affection, which was broken but by death."

Nicholas took the Freeman's Oath as "Nicholas Noise" in Cambridge on May 17, 1637 when he and eight others walked from Newbury to Cambridge to vote for Gov. Winthrop [Records of the Governor and Company of the Massachusetts Bay in New England, 1628-1686 (MBCR) 1:373].

He was admitted to the Newbury church prior to 17 May 1637 implied by freemanship.

On April 21, 1638, he was one of five men fined 2s. 6d. apiece for absence from Newbury town meeting after due warning. The meeting was called to order at eight o'clock in the morning. Two of the men (not Nicholas) had their fines remitted, having sufficient excuses.

It must have been very soon after this in 1638 that Noyes sailed on a voyage to England, possibly to settle family affairs and to report on conditions in Massachusetts Bay. He returned to New England on the Jonathan which sailed from London, probably soon after April 12, 1639, and "came to Anchor in Boston Harbor." Also on the Jonathan were Anthony Somerby of Newbury and Mr. Peter Noyes of Sudbury, who, having come over on the Confidence in 1638, aged 47, and found New England to his liking, had gone back to his home in Penton, near Andover, co. Hants, to fetch his family. Peter was doubtless a kinsman of Nicholas. [EQC 1:268; [New England Historical and Genealogical Register (NEHGR), 32:407-11].

When it was proposed to remove the inhabitants of Newbury from their first settlement on the Parker river to a new site nearer the Merrimac, Nicholas Noyes was a freeholder and a deputy "for the managing of those things that concern the ordering of the New Town" on December 7, 1642.

He was on the Ipswich and Salisbury grand jury, 29 September 1646, 24 April 1649 [EQC 1:103, 164]; petit jury, 28 September 1647, 26 September 1648, 25 March 1651 [EQC 1:124, 146, 210].

In 1650 Nicholas and four other men were before the court for saying that "the elders would transgress for a morsel of bread." He lost no prestige thereby for on September 30, 1651, at Ipswich he was sworn clerk of the Newbury market. In 1652 many were brought before the court for not observing the Sumptuary laws of 1651. The records say "Nicholas Noyes' wife, Hugh March's wife, and William Chandler's wife were each presented for wearing a silk hood and scarf; but were discharged on proof that their husbands were worth £200 each. John Hutchins' wife was also discharged upon testifying that she was brought up above the ordinary rank."

He was Newbury clerk of the market, 30 September 1651 [EQC 1:233; Selectman, 28 January 1660; 15 June 1681 [EQC 4:139, 8:148].

The town voted on November 29, 1652, that a school house be built and that £20 a year be appropriated for the schoolmaster, and Mr. Woodman, Richard Kent, jun., Lieut. Pike and Nicholas Noyes were named the committee to "manage the business" of building a schoolhouse [EQC 2:70].

Thomas Noyes of Sudbury, son of Peter Noyes, had apparently settled in Newbury, but returned to live in Sudbury before 1656 when he appointed his friend Mr. Nicholas Noyes, gentleman, and Robert Long, both of Newbury, his attorneys to let his house and lands.

On 3 May 1654, he was on the Massachusetts Bay committee to enquire about the petitioners in support of Lt. Robert Pike [MBCR 3:345, 4:1:194]. 6 May 1657, he was on the committee to settle the bounds between Salisbury and Hampton [MBCR 3:432, 4:1:292].

Nicholas was appointed "commissioner to end small causes", or local justice, in 1652, 28 March 1654, 25 March 1656, 31 March 1657, 30 March 1658, 29 March 1659, 25 March 1662, 28 June 1664, 27 March 1666, 1668, 30 March 1669, 16 March 1669/70, 31 March 1674, 27 March 1677, 29 November 1681, 1683 [EQC 1:262, 336, 420, 2:11, 69, 151, 371, 3:172, 355, 4:12, 13, 119, 225, 5:290, 6:249, 8:232, 9:167]. His most important service, however, was as deputy to the General Court in 1660 and in 1678 when on September 19 he was chosen by the town "to serve at the next session of the Court until it be ended," a special session having been called for October 2 at which the oath of allegiance to King Charles II was submitted and signed by the deputies; he served also 28 May 1679, 19 May 1680, and 4 Jan 1680-84.

On 30 September 1679, "Nicholas Noyes" was one of ten Newbury men who "were discharged from ordinary training, each paying one bushel of Indian corn yearly" [EQC 7:263-64].

In the long and bitter controversy between Rev. Mr. Parker and Edward Woodman, Nicholas was one of Parker's chief supporters. He was chosen deacon of the First Parish of Newbury on March 20, 1683/4.

Sometime before his death his son Nicholas, the Salem parson, wrote of him as "through the mercy of God yet living, and hath of children, grandchildren and great grandchildren above one hundred."

ESTATE:

On 19 March 1648[/9?], "John Spenser of Newbery" sold to "Nicholas Noice of Nubery ... thirty acres of land lying in Newbury at the west end of his farm on the other side of the street called by the name of Merrimack Street" [ILR 1:95]. On 16 April 1651, "Nicholas Noyes of Newbury ..., yeoman," sold to "George Little of the same town and county, tailor, all that parcel of land, containing sixteen acres ... in Newbury"; acknowledged 11 April 1664 by "Nicholas Noyes ... and Mary Noyse his wife" [ILR 4:186-87]. On 4 January 1653[/4?], "Henry Shorte of Newbury ..., yeoman, & Sarah my wife" sold to "Nicholas Noyes of the aforesaid town & county, yeoman also, all that parcel of land formerly purchased of Nicholas Holt, containing forty acres ... in Newbury" [ILR 5:421].

On 26 April 1655, "Nicholas Noyes of Newbury ... & Mary my wife" sold to "John Allen of the abovesaid town & county all that parcel of land which was lately William Mitchell's, which the said William Mitchell purchased of Jno. Knight Senior & John Knight Junior and of John Davis, except the garden plot & the house & that which the house standeth upon & is for the yard, the which land & house being mortgaged unto Anthony Somerby lately by William Mitchell in his lifetime & since his death his wife not being in a capacity to redeem, the said Nicholas Noyes, with the consent of the widow of the said William Mitchell, deceased, have redeamed it the said house and land, and now also with the consent of the said Mary, the relict of the said William Mitchell deceased, & with the consent also of the abovenamed Anthony Somerby to whom the said land and house was mortgaged, he and said Anthony Somerby yielding hereby up all his right & title and interest in the said house & land"; signed by Nicholas Noyes, Mary Noyes, Mary Savory and Anthony Somerby [ILR 1:195-96].

On 13 October 1659, "John Woolcott of Newbury ..., carpenter, and Mary my wife" sold to "Nicholas Noyes of the said town and county all that six acres of upland and marsh ... lately purchased of Benjamin Swett, granted by the town to Thomas Brown" [ILR 2:69]. On 14 March 1660[/1?], "John Bond of Newbury ... & Esther my wife" sold to "Nicholas Noyes of the abovesaid town & county all that parcel of meadow and upland containing by estimation about nineteen acres" [ILR 2:26].

On 1 April 1673, "Nicholas Noyes and Mary my wife" for a payment of four pounds a year deeded to "our son Cutting Noyse all the right that we have in that farm lying and being on the east side of the way going to Merrimak [illegible] was formerly Stephen Dummer's ... likewise I Nicholas Noyes do reserve four acres of meadow ... which is in exchange for Cutting Noyes to have four acres of salt marsh in Holt's neck, likewise it is agreed upon by Nicholas Noyes and Mary his wife that if the four pounds a year be not paid according to agreement, that then five acres of the plowland and ten acres of the meadow on the south side of the farm the said Nicholas Noyes or Mary his wife may rent out" [ELR 33:8-9].

On 6 April 1682, "Henry Jaquish of Newbury ..., carpenter, ... with the consent of Anne my wife" sold to "Nicholas Noyes of the abovesaid town ..., yeoman, ... a parcel of salt marsh lying and being in the Great Marshes in Newbury containing by estimation four acres" [ELR 14:217].

On 5 July 1692, "Nicholas Noyes Senior of Newbury" sold to "Ensign Joseph Knight of Newbury aforesaid all my right, title & interest in a piece of arable land containing three acres ... in the township of Newbury aforesaid in a common field there known by the name of the Common Great Field" [ELR 22:146].

On 9 April 1696, "Nicholas Noyes of Newbury" sold to "Samuel Smith of Haverhill ... a certain messuage or tenement lying in Haverhill aforesaid containing about twelve acres of land ... also three acres of meadow lying in said Haverhill ... commonly known by the name of Duck Meadow" [ELR 25:103-4].

On 19 April 1698, "Nicholas Noyes Senior of Newbury" deeded to "my loving and dutiful grandson Nicholas Noyes of Newbury aforesaid, the eldest son of my eldest son John Noyes late of Newbury deceased, ... about eighteen acres of upland lying in the township of Newbury ... by name of Deacon Noyes His Neck adjoining unto a parcel of upland which I formerly gave to my son John Noyes deceased ..., also I give to my said grandson Nicholas Noyes Junior eight acres of meadow ... lying in said neck adjoining unto the meadow which I gave to my said son John Noyes aforesaid and was inventoried as his estate" [ELR 15:41-42].

The homestead of Nicholas Noyes was owned and occupied in 1885 by the heirs of Nathaniel Little. Deacon Nicholas NOYES and Mary CUTTING were married on 17 May 1637 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.95,96,103,105,164,166,168,180-183 (Unk (not in Newbury v.s.))

769. Mary CUTTING was born in 1622 in London, Middlesex, England.168,184 She died on 23 Nov 1701 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.168,184 In 1652 many were brought before the court for not observing the Sumptuary laws of 1651. The records say "Nicholas Noyes' wife, Hugh March's wife, and William Chandler's wife were each presented for wearing a silk hood and scarf; but were discharged on proof that their husbands were worth £200 each, John Hutchins' wife was also discharged upon testifying that she was brought up above the ordinary rank." (George F. Dow, "Records and Files of the Quarterly Courts of Essex County, MAssachusetts (Salem, Mass., 1911), 1:303.) Deacon Nicholas NOYES and Mary CUTTING had the following children:

i. Mary NOYES was born on 15 Oct 1641 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.47,94-96,99,167,168,179,185-187 In 1687 she was admitted as a church member at Salisbury Church in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts.188 She signed a will on 26 Nov 1719.188 She died on 5 Sep 1721 in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts.168,188,189 Will (proved) on 28 Sep 1722.188 She was also known as Mary Noyce.186
ii. Hannah NOYES was born on 31 Oct 1643 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.47,94-96,99,167,168,179,183,185-187,190 NEHG Register, Vol. 149 and VR says "last of Oct., 1643".

Reminiscences of a Nonagenarian says Oct. 31st, 1643.

The Noyes Descendants, Vol. I, Noyes Genealogy, and Family Archives #17 all say 13 Oct 1643. She died on 5 Jan 1704/5 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.191
iii. John NOYES92,192,193 was born on 20 Jan 1645/46 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.32,47,92,95,96,99,168,187,194-197 He died in 1691/92 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.92,96,179,192,197,198 (Automated Archives and Noyes Pedigree say about 1692.) He was a carpenter.92,194 John grew up in Newbury. He first shows up in town records when he testified in court on 27 Apr 1669 in a case that involved John Woolcott and Peter Tappan on one hand and Nathaniel Cheny on the other. He took the freeman's oath on 9 Jan 1674 with his brother Cutting. John was a house carpenter who lived in the "farms district". His house was built in 1677. His home lot originally belonged to John Hull. One of his descendants, Luther Noyes, lived in this house during the late 1800's. In 1678 John Noyes, John Hale and Francis Tharley fixed the bridge over the Newbury River. John was a juror on 27 Sep 1681. He died in 1691 at the age of 45. He is mentioned in his father's will as deceased. His widow Mary and son Nicholas settled his estate (personal £309, real estate £246). The account was made on 28 Sep 1694. An inventory of his estate (on 22 Sep 1693) by Tristraim Coffin, Abraham Adams and Joseph Pike revealed his lifestyle. He had a house and a barn on a 12 acre homestead. He had 20 acres of meadow and 30 acres of upland. Animals included 2 oxen, 7 cows, 25 sheep and a horse. He had 2 feather beds, a chest, a table and chairs. Kitchen items included iron pots, a frying pan, tubs, barrels, wooden ware, napkins and table cloths. Tools included carpenter's tools, husbandry tools, a spinning wheel, a loom and an iron. Other items found in the inventory included clothes, books, arms, pewter and brass ware.

From "Genealogical Record of Noyes descendents": John purchased property for home in "Farms District" after former owner, John Hull, died in 1670. "The house, a substantial ediface, was built in a style unusual for a farmhouse in those early days. The front hall is maniscotted, and a handsome staircase with the elaborately curved balusters, these fashonable for the first class mansions, leads to the second story. The kitchen...was huge even for the period; an ox could have roasted whole in its capacious recess. This homestead was descended from John of the second generation, to his son and grandson Daniel, to Maj. Samuel, to Samuel his son and was owned in 1879 by his son, Luther Noyes.

He was listed in the 1688 Newbury tax roll at 5+13 acres. He was listed as deceased in his father's will of 1700 and also in the entry for his daughter's marriage in 1700. Sources of information: Vital records of Newbury, Massachusetts, to the end of the year 1849; New England Historical and Genealogical Register (vol:page).

"Old Newbury": In 1677 John Noyes bought of Edmund Moores, Jr. eleven acres of land that had formerly belonged to John Hull, late of Newbury, and was known as Hull's Plain. John Noyes died in 1691, leaving a family of ten children. He built one half of the house still standing in 1912, the other half built by a later generation.

NEHGR: Declared freeman 9 Jan 1673/74.

Noyes Pedigree: He died in Newbury, intestate, 1691/92.
iv.

Rev. Nicholas NOYES Jr.92,199,200 was born on 22 Dec 1647 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.47,48,92,95,96,99,113,168,185,187,201,202 He graduated in 1667 in Harvard College, Boston North, Middlesex, Massachusetts.47,92,168,187,200,202-204 (A.B. [Sibley 2:239-46]). On 19 Dec 1675 he was Chaplain of Connecticut Regiment.92 Great Swamp fight. He was ordained on 14 Nov 1683 in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts.92,202 First Church He died on 13 Dec 1717 in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts.92,168,187,200,202,203,205,206 Ae. 70 y. wanting 8 days. Nicholas Noyes Rev. Born 22 Dec 1647, in Newbury, Massachusetts. Died 13 Dec 1717, in Salam, Massachusetts. Nicholas graduated at Harvard, 1667 (A.B.) and was made freeman 13 May 1669. He was Chaplain of Connecticut regiment at Great Swamp Fight, 19 Dec 1675. He preached 13 years at Haddam, Connecticut and became the seventh minister in Salem, Massachusetts 23 Oct 1682-83 with a salary of £80 and 20 cords of wood annually, and was ordained over the First Church 14 Nov 1683. He officiated as clergyman at the hanging of the witches, 22 Sep 1692, and later in life he repented of his part in the witchcraft persecutions, and did what he could to assist the dependent families. In 1698 he preached the election sermon, and about 1702 wrote the memoir of his uncle Rev. James Noyes, in Mather's Magnalia. Rev Nicholas never married.

Savage, Vol. 3, p.298: NICHOLAS, Salem, s. of the preced. Nicholas preach. many yrs. at Haddam, but having in 1682 a call to S. to assist the venera. John Higginson, he became his collea. ord. 14 Nov. 1683, was one of the promoters of the horrible delusion of 1692, and yet a d. of his noble collea. was one of the accused. He died not altogether lose his faculties, as his let. to Mather of the character of his uncle, wh. is certain. one of the best parts of the strange. compound of materials in the Magnalia; as also a good epistle to John Higginson in London, preserv. in 3 Mass. Hist. Coll. VII. 212, will prove. He d. 13 Dec. 1717, unm.

According to "Col. Fam.,"...freeman 13 May 1669; Chaplain of Conn. Regt. at the Great Swamp Fight, 19 Dec. 1675."

Also, a witness at the hanging of at least 4 "witches" in Salem.

Hist. of Salem, Vol III, p.127: The largest library in Salem at this period belonged to Rev. Nicholas Noyes, which was valued at the time of his death at £88, eighteen shillings and eight pence. Books had greatly increased in numbers, and a variety of subject matter. Religious books were not in the great majority that they had been.

Hist. of Salem, Vol III, p.408: After the death of Mr. Higginson, Rev. Nicholas Noyes was the sole pastor of the First Church. It appears that he wished to have George Corwin, as a colleague, soon after Mr. Higginson's death. At length, in May, 1711, he was invited to become a colleague of Mr. Noyes over the First Church here.

"Nicholas Noyes at Salem (Mass?) before 1685 wrote this homely, yet sensible
quatrain :
They who write histories
Write many things they see with others' eyes ;
'Tis fair, where nought is feigned, nor undigested,
Nor ought but what is credibly attested."
Unquote.
(Nought (naught) means nothing, and ought (aught) means anything in
the above verse.
Nought, naught, nothing has changed in 318 years regarding
confirmation of data.

eminiscences: Preached at Haddam, Conn., thirteen years, ordained over the first society in Salem, Nov. 14th, 1683.
v. Dea. Cutting NOYES93,97,193,207 was born on 23 Sep 1649 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.47,48,92,95,96,99,121,168,187,207,208 He signed a will on 16 Jul 1730 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.92,97,207,209 (In the Name of God amen; The sixteenth Day of July 1730, I Cutting Noyes of Newbury in the County of Essex in his majesties Province of Massachusetts Bay in New England being of perfect mind & memory, Thanks be given unto God, Therefore calling unto mind the mortality of my Body [___], do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament; That is to say Principally and first of all, I give and recommend my Soul into the Hands of God that gave it, [___], and my Body I recommend to the Earth to be buried in a decent Christian Burial at the Discretion of my Executors [___], and as touching such worldly Estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this Life, I give devise and dispose of the same in the following manner and Form.

Impr. I give and bequeath to Elizabeth Noyes my beloved Wife twelve Pounds in money or Bills of Credit and fifteen Ounces out of the Silver I have in my House and all my Stock of living Creatures and all my Household Goods and also I appoint my two Sons John Noyes & Joseph Noyes to keep for their mother, my abovesaid Wife two Cows winter and Summer, and they shall provide for her six Cord of good wood suitable for her and twenty Bushels of Indian Corn and two Bushels of wheat and three Bushels of Rye and six Bushels of Barley and one hundred Pound of good salt Beef, and six Pound of sheeps Wool, and eight Pound of flax [T__] and one third Part of the Apples that shall grow in my Orchard yearly; and I appoint my said two Sons John and Joseph to pay to said mother said Payments yearly the wood to be delivered at the House, and the other Things also, or where she shall order to be delivered, and also I give my said Wife ye Use and improvement of the southerly half of my dwelling House with convenient Cellar room for her and Liberty of using the well for water, and Priviledge of keeping a [___] or [Two?] at the door, and also the Use of a suitable garden spot of Land, and my Will is that my said two Sons shall pay said yearly Payments each of them the one half thereof, and fence said Garden and keep it fenced, all which I give my said Wife in Case she demand no Third or Right of dower in my real Estate, and in Case my said Wife see cause to [marry?] again she shall have none of said yearly Payments so long as she [is?] a married woman, but at all Times when she is a widow she may demand and [___] ye abovesaid Priviledges and Payments, as if she had remained a Widow, and in Case what is above given to my said Wife, be not enough to maintain my said Wife comfortably and Credibly, Then my said Two Sons shall provide for her all [Things?] that she shall want in Sickness and in Health during her Widowhood and at her Decease give her a a decent burial (in Case she be a widow) And further my Will is that what my Wife shall leave at her decease of [what?] is above given her and undisposed of by her, shall be equally divided to and among my [three?] daughters, namely Elizabeth and Bathsheba Pettingall and Mary Moulton, or such as shall legally represent them.

2 To my Son John Noyes [___] his heirs and assigns forever, I give and bequeath the one half [of my?] Land and meadow called my Homestead ye southerly Half of it, from the High Way down to half way [___] meadow and the One half of ye Remainder of ye Homestead and one half of my two Lotts of pasture land in the lower Commons in Newbury, & the one half of my other Land, lately laid Out to my Common Rights, and one half of ye Lands belonging to my Rights in the undivided Lands in Newbury and one half of my Lott of Land at Indian Hill ye southwesterly half by measure, & I give my Son John my Case of glass bottles after ye Decease of my Wife, and I appoint my Son John to pay to his mother ye one half of ye yearly Payments as above given to her.

3 I give to my Daughter Elizabeth Pettingall thirteen Pound in money or Bills of Credit to be paid by my Son John Noyes & Eleven Pounds to be paid by my Executor.

4 I give to my daughter Bathsheba Pettingall ten Pounds in money or Bills of Credit fourteen Pounds to be paid by my Executor & ye sd. ten Pounds to be paid by my son John Noyes.

5 I give to my daughter Mary Moulton ten Pounds to be paid by my Son John Noyes in money or Bills of Credit and fourteen Pounds to be paid by my Executor.

6 I give to my son Cutting Noyes three Pounds in money or Bills of Credit to be paid by my Executor having paid said Cutting his Portion already.

7 I give to my Grandson Jacob Noyes three Pounds in money or Bills of Credit to be paid by my Executor.

8 I give to my Grandson Samuel Noyes four Pounds in money or Bills of Credit to be paid by my Executor.

9 I give to my Wife my wearing Apparell to dispose as she please, & I give to my Grand Daughter Eliza. Noyes fifteen Pounds to be paid by my Executor in one year after My Decease.

10 I give to my Son Joseph Noyes and to his Heirs and assigns forever the northerly half of my Homestead down to half way the meadow, and half the Remainder of ye Homestead meadow, and my Will is that ye lower half of my Homestead meadow shall be equally divided betwixt my two Sons John & Joseph Noyes in Quantity and Quality, and my Half of the Lane called Rolfs Lane, is to be reckoned as a Part of Josephs half of the Homestead, and also I give my said Son Joseph Noyes his Heirs and assigns forever the one half of my two Lotts of pasture Land in the lower Commons in Newbury, and one half of my Lands lately laid Out, and one half of ye Lands belonging to my Common Rights, and one half of my lott of Land at Indian Hill ye northeasterly half of it, and I give to my Son Joseph Noyes ye Buildings on his half of the Homestead, also my Will is that my Sons John & Joseph Noyes and their Respective Heirs and assigns shall have Liberty of passing & repassing over each others Lands herein given to them for the improving the Lands not in Corn Fields or in mowing Lands, but so as may be most convenient and doing each other as Little damage as may be, and my Son Joseph Noyes shall pay to his mother my now Wife, the one half of ye yearly Payments as above given to her, & the Legacies given in this my Will shall be paid within two years after my Decease, and further I give to my Son Joseph Noyes all my Estate both real and personal which is not disposed of in this my Will, and I do ordain and appoint my Son Joseph Noyes to be the sole Executor of this my last Will and Testament to receive all my Debts and to pay all my Just Debts & Legacies as he is above Ordered to Pay and my funeral Charges & my Executor shall provide a Man & Horse and carry his above named mother to and from meeting & at all Other Times as she shall desire (so long as she is a Widow) to be carried from Place [___] and I give to the first Church in Newbury Twenty Shillings, & I do revoke and disallow all f[ormer?] Wills by me made and ratify and confirm this my last Will and Testament [___] whereof I the abovenamed Cutting Noyes have set to my Hand & Seal ye Day and Year above written.

Signed, sealed, published & declared by the abovesaid Cutting Noyes to be his last Will & Testament in Presence of Witnesses

Samuel Moody
Joseph Lunt
Nathanael Coffin

his mark

Cutting Noyes (seal) He died on 25 Oct 1734 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.92,96,168,207,210,211 (Ae. 85 y. 1 m. 2 d.) Will (proved) on 18 Nov 1734.92,97,207 He was a cordwainer.92,187 He was a Captain-lieutenant in the militia.92 He was Deacon of the First Parish.92 NEHG Register: He was made freeman, 9 Jan., 1673/4, was a cordwainer, captain-lieutenant in the militia, and deacon of the First Parish.

Mass. and Maine Families: Represented the town in the General Court 1709-1712.

On 10 April 1718, "Simon French and Abigail his wife both of Salisbury" sold to "our brothers Cutting Noyes and James Noyes in equal degrees all our right, title and interest in the estate of our late brother the Reverend Mr. Nicholas Noyes late of Salem ... deceased" [ELR 33:221-22].
vi. Sarah NOYES was born on 13 Sep 1651 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.47,48,92,94-97,99,108,166,168 She died on 21 Feb 1652/53 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.48,92,96,97,168 (Savage, Vol. 3, p.297: Died soon after birth. Mass. & Maine Families says Feb. 21, 1652.)
vii. Sarah NOYES was born on 22 Aug 1653 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.47,48,92,94-99,108,168,185,212 VR spelled Sara daughter of Nicholas. She died after 20 Jul 1714 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.213
viii. Timothy NOYES92,214 was born on 23 Jun 1655 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.47,48,58,92,94-99,215,216 He signed a will on 19 Aug 1718.92,215 He died on 21 Aug 1718 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.92,97,151,217 ( Mr TIMOTHY NOYES
DIED AUGUST Ye 21
1718 & IN Ye 63d YEARE
OF HIS AGE
GOOD TIMOTHY IN
HIS YOUTHFUL DAYS
HE LIVED MUCH
UNTO GODS PRAYS
WHEN AGE CAME ONE
HE AND HIS WIFE
THEY LIVED A HOLY
AND PIOUS LIFE
THEREFORE YOU CHILDREN
WHOSE NAMES ARE NOYES
MAKE JESUS CHRIST YOUR ONLY CHOYSE) He was buried after 21 Aug 1718 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.97,214,217,218 (Headstone in First Parish Burying Ground). Will (proved) on 2 Oct 1718.92,215 Credited with service in King Philip's war (Nov. 24, 1676). Inventory of will was taken Nov., 1718. Legatees were named: Wife Mary was to have the westerly end of the house; James to have one-fourth of the freehold in the upper woods, which his father gave the testator, also his part of the rate lot; Isaac (deceased), who left wife Jane and child Enoch under 21; Nicholas to be clothes etc, if he learn the trade or mystery of a doctor; Timothy to have the residue, to include most of the real estate, and if he should decease without children, the same to go to said James to be paid out to the other heirs, as Timothy should, and James to be the executor; Abigail, then unmarried; Sarah, who had received a portion of her share; Martha, who had already a part of her share; Mary, then unmarried; Rachael, then unmarried; the daughters Abigail, Mary and Rachael to have liberty to dwell in the back room of the house until married; Abigail to have liberty to take wood from his land at the Neck.

His real estate "homestead, 8 acres, valued £200; ten acres in the great field, £24; four acres of land, little meadow, £20; six acres of woodland at the Neck, £30; the wood lots and right in the common, £16; quarter of the Freehold & River lots, £70; quarter of the rate lot upper woods, £80; about 14 acres of salt meadow, £70. Inventory £809, 10 shillings." The headstone at his grave is still standing in the Newbury cemetery.

Savge, Vol. 3, p.298: Freeman 1684.

Noyes Pedigree: He was made freeman 13 Feb 1684.
384 ix. Lieut. Colonel James B. NOYES.
x. Abigail NOYES93 was born on 11 Apr 1659 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.47,48,92,94-99,185,186,219 Reminiscences of a Nonagenarian says April 1657. She died on 27 Jan 1746/47 in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts.219 On 10 April 1718, "Simon French and Abigail his wife both of Salisbury" sold to "our brothers Cutting Noyes and James Noyes in equal degrees all our right, title and interest in the estate of our late brother the Reverend Mr. Nicholas Noyes late of Salem ... deceased" [ELR 33:221-22].
xi. Rachel NOYES was born on 20 Mar 1660/61 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.47-49,92,94,95,97-99,108,115,185 Savage, Family Archives #17, and Noyes Pedigree say 10 May 1661. She died on 24 May 1720 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.92,98,115,220 ("In her 60th year.")
xii. Thomas NOYES Jr. was born on 20 Jun 1663 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.47-49,58,92,94,95,97-99,221 He died before 30 Dec 1695 in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts.48,49,92,97,98 Date administrator was appointed on his estate. He lived in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts.92
xiii. Rebecca NOYES was born on 18 May 1665 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.47-49,92,94,95,97-99,108 She died on 1 Dec 1683 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.48,49,92,97-99,222 (Savage, Vol. 3, p.297: Died at 18 years. Reminiscences of a Nonagenarian says Dec. 21st, 1683.)

770. John KNIGHT Jr.92,101 was born before 14 May 1626 in England.223 He was baptized on 14 May 1626 in Romsey, Hampshire, England.102,223 He emigrated in Apr 1635 from Southampton, Hampshire, England.102 Crossed on the 'James'. He died on 7 Feb 1677 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.102 Freeman 1671 John KNIGHT Jr. and Bathsheba INGERSOLL were married before 1648 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.101,224

771. Bathsheba INGERSOLL92 was born about 1629 in Sutton, Bedfordshire, England.225 She died on 24 Oct 1705 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.101,102 John KNIGHT Jr. and Bathsheba INGERSOLL had the following children:

i. John KNIGHT III was born on 16 Aug 1648 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.101,102 He died in May 1725 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.
ii. Ens. Joseph KNIGHT92 was born on 21 Jun 1652 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.101,102 He died on 29 Jan 1723 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.226,227
iii. Elizabeth KNIGHT was born on 18 Oct 1655 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.92,101,102,207,228,229 She died on 20 Jan 1746/47 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.92,116,207,229 In her 92nd year.
iv. Mary KNIGHT was born on 8 Sep 1657 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.92,98,101,102,230
v. Sarah KNIGHT was born on 13 Apr 1660 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.101,102 She died on 10 Mar 1707/8 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.107
vi. KNIGHT was born on 13 Apr 1660 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.102 She died on 27 Apr 1660 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.102
vii. Hannah KNIGHT101 was born on 22 Mar 1661/62 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.101,102 She died on 30 Jul 1664 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.102 Died young.
385 viii. Hannah KNIGHT.
ix. Capt. Richard KNIGHT231 was born on 26 Jul 1666 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.101,102,232 He signed a will on 8 Feb 1734/35.231 He died after 8 Feb 1734/35.231 At the birth of his children Richard is listed as a Corporal but in later records he was a Captain in the French and Indian War.
x. Benjamin KNIGHT was born on 21 Aug 1668 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.101,102 He died about 1737 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.107
xi. Isaac KNIGHT was born on 31 Aug 1672 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.101,102 He died on 29 Jul 1690 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.101,102 Savage says 1690.

792. Moses LITTLE37 was born on 11 Mar 1656/57 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.37,124,233 He died on 8 Mar 1691 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.154,227 (Died of smallpox.) Moses served as a soldier in King Phillip's war, and was town collector for several terms. Moses LITTLE and Lydia COFFIN were married before 1679.227,234-236 (Based on birth of son, John.)

793. Lydia COFFIN was born on 22 Apr 1662 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.227,233-235,237 Moses LITTLE and Lydia COFFIN had the following children:

i. John LITTLE was born on 8 Jan 1679 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.129
402 ii. Tristram LITTLE.
iii. Sarah LITTLE was born on 28 Mar 1684 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.123,238,239 Descendants of George Little says 28 April 1684. She died on 10 Dec 1710 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.123,239
iv. Mary LITTLE was born on 13 Jun 1686 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.127,240 She died in Jun 1761 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.123,241
v. Elizabeth LITTLE was born on 25 May 1688 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.74 She died on 25 Mar 1719 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.107
396 vi. Moses LITTLE.

794. Lieut Stephen JAQUES145,242 was born on 9 Sep 1661 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.243-245 He signed a will on 13 Aug 1743.242 He left his homestead to John and Samuel Jaques, sons of his son Samuel. To his son Stephen. To his cousin (nephew) Richard Jaques. To his son Richard Jaques, 200 acres at Coxhall. To his son Benjamin. To his grandson Eliphalet Jaques. To his four daughters, Mary, Sarah, Anne and Elizabeth. To his grandson Parker Jaques, his right in the plantation of Contoocook. To Sarah and Eleanor Jaques, daughters of his son Stephen, £100 each. To his daughter Sarah, £56. To his daughter Anne, £57. To his daughter Elizabeth, £12: 4: 0. To his granddaughter Ruth Mooers, £3. To his granddaughter Mary Noyes, £8. To his daughter Elizabeth, £9. To his son Henry Jaques's widow, £5. To his grandson Parker Jaques, £20. To his granddaughter Mary Pierce, £10. To his granddaughters Love Jaques and Florence Jaques, £10 each. To his grandson Samuel Jaques, son of his son Samuel, £5 and £8 more to be paid by his kinsman Richard Jaques after receiving his above legacy. To his daughter-in-law Lydia Pearson, £5 to be paid by her sons John and Samuel Jaques. To his daughter Thankful Jaques, while she remains his son Stephen's widow, a room in his house and the use of part of the cellar, the orchard and the garden. To his son Stephen, his Indian man Will. Executors: son Stephen and grandson John Jaques, to whom all the personal estate. Witnesses: John Pike, Joseph Ilsley, Tristram Little. He died after 13 Aug 1743 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.242 Will (proved) on 29 Oct 1744.242 He was Housewright.244 On Dec. 12, 1698, Sergt. Stephen Jaques, having been on the committee to plan the new meeting house, contracted to build it for the sum of £530. It was to be 60 feet by 50 feet and 24 feet stud, and Jaques completed it in 1700. In 1703 Ensign Stephen Jaques, Mr. Benjamin Woodbridge and Henry Jaques (his nephew) were setting up a windmill. He was a lieutenant in the military company in 1718/19. His account book, containing local information, is preserved in the Essex Institute. Lieut Stephen JAQUES and Deborah PLUMER were married on 13 May 1684 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.126,244-247

795. Deborah PLUMER was born on 13 Mar 1664/65 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.245,246 She died before 1744.248 Lieut Stephen JAQUES and Deborah PLUMER had the following children:

i. Stephen JAQUES was born on 5 Feb 1684/85 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.242 He died on 12 Mar 1684/85 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.242
ii. Deac. Stephen JAQUES145,242 was born on 28 Jul 1686 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.115,126,242 He graduated in 1707 in Harvard College, Boston North, Middlesex, Massachusetts.242 He lived in Yarmouth, Cumberland, Maine in 1711.242 The town of Yarmouth engaged "Mr. Jaquesh" to keep an English school and a grammar school to teach Latin. He received £24 a year and 5s. a week for board. He lived in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts in 1713.242 He signed a will on 18 Jun 1771 in Salem, Essex, Massachusetts.145 Mentions his daughter Susannah Noyes. He died before 3 Nov 1778 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.242 Will (proved) on 3 Nov 1778.145,242 Estate was worth £813. He was Farmer, deacon and notary.242 In 1711 the town of YArmouth engaged "Mr. Jaquesh" to keep an English school and a grammar school to teach Latin. He received £24 a year and 5s. a week for board. After marrying Thankful Taylor, they returned to Newbury where he was a farmer, deacon and notary. His estate was worth £813.

On 26 Feb 1738/39, he bought of Enoch Noyes, 22 rods of land, with dwelling house thereon, now known as the Ilsley house (95:192 and 98:82 at Salem). On 29 Sep 1752, he sold this house and land to Daniel Clark.
iii. Henry JAQUES was born in 1689 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.242 He died on 20 Jul 1723.242 Ae. 35 y.
iv. Samuel JAQUES was born on 19 Mar 1692 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.125,126,245 He died before 1 Mar 1729.245
v. Mary JAQUES was born on 26 Sep 1694 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.115,125,126 On 30 May 1736 she was admitted as a church member at 1st Church in Falmouth, York, Massachusetts [Maine].115 She died on 4 Apr 1771.248
397 vi. Sarah JAQUES.
vii. Rev. Richard JAQUES Jr.126 was born on 1 Apr 1700 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.115,125,249 He graduated in 1720 in Harvard College, Boston North, Middlesex, Massachusetts.125 He was ordained in 1725 in Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts.125 He died on 10 Apr 1777 in Gloucester, Essex, Massachusetts.115,125,250 (Died in poverty after a long illness.) Minister in Gloucester, Massachusetts.
viii. Benjamin JAQUES was born on 23 Sep 1702 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.55,125,126,145,251 He died on 13 Sep 1782 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.125,252 Ae. 79 y. 11 m.
ix. Ann JAQUES was born on 25 Feb 1705 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.125,126 She died on 14 Sep 1778.253
x. Elizabeth JAQUES125 was born in Feb 1708 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.254

798. Stephen COFFIN was born on 18 Aug 1664/65 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.138,139,255 VR spells Steven. He died on 31 Aug 1725 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.138,139,256 Stephen COFFIN and Sarah ATKINSON were married on 8 Oct 1685 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.136,138,139,257-259 VR spells Steven.

799. Sarah ATKINSON was born on 27 Nov 1665 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.139,258-260 She died on 20 Jan 1724 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.138,256 Coffin says 1725. Stephen COFFIN and Sarah ATKINSON had the following children:

399 i. Sarah COFFIN.
ii. Tristram COFFIN was born on 14 Jan 1688 in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts.138 He died on 9 Mar 1688 in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts.138
iii. Tristram COFFIN was born on 6 Mar 1689 in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts.138 He died on 23 Jan 1718 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.138
iv. Lydia COFFIN was born on 21 Jul 1691 in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts.138,139
v. Judith COFFIN was born on 23 Feb 1693 in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts.138,139 She died on 17 Dec 1769 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.261
vi. John COFFIN was born on 20 Jan 1695 in Haverhill, Essex, Massachusetts.262 He died on 19 Nov 1764.138
vii. Abigail COFFIN was born on 25 Sep 1696 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.138,139 She died in 1777.138,139
viii. Stephen COFFIN was born in 1698 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.263 He died in 1734.262
ix. Daniel COFFIN was born on 19 Sep 1700 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.264
x. Abner COFFIN was born on 29 Apr 1702 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.264
xi. Mary COFFIN was born on 26 Sep 1704 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.265
xii. Joseph COFFIN was born on 26 Dec 1706 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.265 He died on 23 Nov 1758.266
xiii. Benjamin COFFIN was born on 14 Jun 1710 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.264,267 He died on 30 Apr 1784 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.268 (Ae. 73 y.)

804. is the same as person number 792.

805. is the same as person number 793.

806. Henry DOLE269 was born on 9 Mar 1662/63 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.149,270,271 He died on 13 Sep 1690 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.149,272 Son of Richard Dole. Married his step-sister, Sarah Brocklebank. Henry DOLE and Sarah BROCKLEBANK were married on 3 Nov 1686 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.251,271,273-275

807. Sarah BROCKLEBANK was born on 7 Jul 1668 in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts.275,276 She was baptized on 12 Jul 1668 in Rowley, Essex, Massachusetts.276 She died on 20 Apr 1750 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.256,275,277 Henry DOLE and Sarah BROCKLEBANK had the following children:

i. Apphiah DOLE was born on 20 Feb 1687/88 in Newbury, Essex, Massachusetts.149,278 She died on 9 Oct 1694.146
403 ii. Sarah DOLE.

808. is the same as person number 384.

809. is the same as person number 385.

810. is the same as person number 402.

811. is the same as person number 403.